Tool Talk

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member
Want to show off your new tool, or your whole set? Want to make a recommendation on a tool that worked well for your job, or one to avoid? Maybe just want to talk about them? Here's the place!

I'll start things off by mentioning the LED trouble lamp I just got. It's the Bayco with a 60-LED floodlamp and 6-LED flashlight. Plugs in and recharges, then just take it out with you and do your thing. Handily came with both a home and a car charger, though for now I've got it hanging up downstairs. It certainly makes it easier than trying to run a big extension cord and finagling with a good old-fashioned incandescent trouble lamp, though the old lamp gives you some nice heat if you're doing a winter job.
 
I love tools, I have a lot so I wouldn't really know where to start. I will say that I love Milwaukee cordless tools. i have a lot of the m12 tools and there is one in particular i found useful recently. I needed to change my exhaust manifold because it was cracked. low and behold upon removal the very last stud on the back at the firewall broke off with no hesitation. I was furious, but i remembered seeing a 90 deg drill at home depot so i took some measurements and went to check it out. with the drill bit cut down a little i was able to drill the hole and re-tap it! Whew :yes:



It has good torque, battery lasted threw drilling and tapping the hole, and running the tap in/out of all the other holes. $80 tool only at home depot. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

Mark20

Well-Known Member
Right angle Phillips/standard screwdriver. First saw one in high school. When I saw one at Sears it was mine! Has gotten me out of a few pickles.
 

Hypnotoad

Well-Known Member
I have quite a few toys, I mean tools, that I use at work that I think are pretty cool, but are probably pretty boring to others. Mostly a hand full of terminal crimping tools.

Here's my latest set I picked up at Costco for $15.
uploadfromtaptalk1399780775710.jpg

Looks pretty lame, but this is the most handy little ratchet set. It's metric and standard. It has a really fine tooth ratchet that articulates and gets into tight spaces. Just wish it came with deep sockets.
 
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IllogicTC

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member
Sometimes a shorter ratchet handle fits the bill, especially a flex-head one! Is that case metal with a plastic window?

Speaking of tools at work, here's the full list of stuff I get to use:
Air drills of all sorts. We have this blue one in particular that has balls like you wouldn't believe, but the name plate is long gone so I don't know what it is. Most of our "standard" air drills are made by Sioux Tools in NC, though we have a drop-style one that's made by a Sioux Tools of Sioux Falls, IA. At some point we got a drill from NAPA, too lol. Then there's the Ingersoll-Rand fitted with an automatic screw feeder, that thing's pretty neat but a piece of crap.

DeWalt 12V drill. The first one was an 18V impact-style, and we're using them to actuate the window operators to close them quickly. As you can imagine the impact was stripping the operators out hardcore.

Diagonal cutters, and.... non-diagonal cutters? Side cutters I guess?

9/16th flat wrench. By flat I mean it's really thin, it's meant to fit to the hinge stud between the arm and track for sash adjustment.

Of course, measuring tapes, nothing special.

And a dead-blow hammer for resilient snap rings (and for anger ventilation unofficially).

Nothing super-fun like the machinery though, except that blue air drill without a name. I seriously gotta find it out, we have self-tapping screws that take about a second with the Sioux drills to put in... that blue one does them practically instantly.

I'll get some photos of my rag-tag assortment I have at the house some time. Missing a few things that'd be nice, there's a heavy emphasis toward auto vs home tools, but it gets me along in most things.
 

jimmyjam

Well-Known Member
BlazingTrails said:
I love tools, I have a lot so I wouldn't really know where to start. I will say that I love Milwaukee cordless tools.
love my milwaukee tools as well. use my m12 impact and sawzall almost daily. have m18 tools also for bigger jobs but 90% of the time I'm using the minis
 
jimmyjam said:
love my milwaukee tools as well. use my m12 impact and sawzall almost daily. have m18 tools also for bigger jobs but 90% of the time I'm using the minis
Me too, I have the 1/2 hammer drill, band saw, impact gun, sawzall, small radio, 90 deg 3/8 drill, 2 chargers, (3) reg batteries, (1) 4.0 battery. and almost all of my hand tools at work are Milwaukee. And also a couple of the DMM.
 

Robbabob

Well-Known Member
BlazingTrails said:
small radio
Did you hear, they're coming out with a bluetooth radio?

We are installing a hole saw paint system at their manufacturing plant in Greenwood, MS, so I've been hearing about a lot of their "tools".
 

blazinlow89

Well-Known Member
Since this thread is about tools I will add my photo that I put up in the Cargo Area thread.

All of my stuff is mismatched, between Stanley, Kobalt and Craftsman, with some Blue Point and other stuff mixed in. My latest addition is a Husky hex key set, that has a handle for the larger hex keys to be more like a t-handle. You still have the L-shape for normal use and a t-handle for that extra torque when needed. I also picked up a set of 3 step drill bits. They were only $10 at some harbor freight type store in TN, they are titanium and go up to 3/4 of an inch.


[sharedmedia=core:attachments:55814]
 
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IllogicTC

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member
Hey that reminds me, I still need a breaker bar. My last belt de-tension I used my 1/2 drive with a 1/2-3/8 adapter. Not ideal of course and eats up room, but on the bright side it kept me away from the cam sensor.
 
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IllogicTC

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member
I got a bunch of tool porn (shots of some of my stuff), if only the local cell tower would stop being on "call/text" only and come back up to EDGE so I can send them over... Yeah, I'm in the stone age without 3G and all that.

It's not an exhaustive profiling, but outlines some of the mix-and-match that gets me by.
 
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IllogicTC

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member
My promised tool porn! It's not an exhaustive detailing of my little collection, but it covers most of the basics.



Big Stanley set I've had for a while. Some of the pieces in this I have in other photos to provide more detail. This is my standard grab when I'm going to service something as it contains about 90% of what I'll end up using.



This is my old "quick-fix" set. They're not meant to be permanent, just something to get me to the store for a proper fix if wiring breaks or something. The fuses on the left are the full-size one and so are useless to me but maybe my neighbor will need one or something. I have a separate package of wire nuts besides the ones shown, mainly for house wiring and such. No clue where the wire strippers from this set went...



A Coleman Powermate set which was given to me. Needs a new battery as the current one doesn't hold charge for long. Includes a drill, circular saw, jigsaw and a lamp.



My in-car set. I don't usually keep much else in there to be honest though I should assemble a small emergency kit. A simple dial gauge for tire pressure as I don't trust the random ones on air pumps at convenience stores and such, and then my code reader.



An overview of my little tool corner. This is the last photo you'll see of it looking so orderly...



With the tray still in



Tray removed



Ratchets and C-Clamps. The clamps are 3" and 4", a 6" one is a planned acquisition. Then a single 1/4 drive, 3 3/8 drives, and a 1/2 drive, topped off with one of those cheap-o 1/2 drive torque wrenches from HF.

More in the next post.
 
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IllogicTC

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member


Hex keys. Husky Metric and SAE to the right, Stanley to the left (came in the mechanic set). Then a little metric Stanley set from another set, don't know where the SAEs ever went... oh well!



The Bayco light up top, a file down on the bottom (originally for working with PVC), a couple pairs of pliers on the left and hex bits on the right. I got the Metric set literally just to have the 10mm one for the transfer case. The two sockets are set out from the rest (which won't be shown) as they're special sizes. The big one is a 35mm for the axle nut, and the small one is a 32mm shallow purchased specifically for the roommate's G6 oil filter thing.



Screw drivers. Philips to the left, Straight to the right. The black-handled one is a socket driver, and then my precision set.



3-piece detail brush set, and then my two multimeters. The analog one is my first one ever, the digital is what I usually use. I do plan to get a better one (I would prefer one with a better brand-name behind it, and the ability to read hz/duty cycle).



Pliers and wrenches. All those wrenches are actually my back-ups, in case one breaks. Some sizes have two of the same size on the ring. Then more wrenches up top, the monkey wrench was originally for replacing the tub faucet but I'm sure it'll have its uses elsewhere.



More wrenches. This is what's usually in my other hand when I'm heading out to do some work. Had some larger sizes which is a boon to me (the adjustable wrench in the prior picture covers up to I believe 32mm for the even-larger sizes).



My "nipple-twisters" as I call them on bottom. Ratheting box wrenches, unfortunately I only have them in SAE. Some pliers up top, finally got new wire strippers, hopefully Commercial Electric (yet another pseudonym for Mastek) pliers work better than I heard their multimeters do.



Extensions and other rathet stuff! Still need to get some wobbles. 2 3" and a 10" 3/8 extensions, 5" I believe 1/2 extension, and 7 or so and a 3" 1/4 extension. Universals for the 1/2 and 3/8 drives. Two bit adapters, two 3/8-1/4 adapters, a 1/2-3/8 adapter and strangely a 1/4-3/8 adapter (never seen one that UPSCALED before)

Not shown: various other sockets of common sizes, my "main" drill and the bits I use with it (can kinda be seen if you look hard enough at the tray-removed pic), and a few other things. Bits for boring a hole for installing deadbolts and the like, those flat-looking bits with the pointed tip for more "making-holes," basic tape measure, etc.

I hope you enjoyed the peek at my little collection. Feel free to show what you got!
 

MAY03LT

Founding Member
Lifetime VIP Supporter
IMG_20140512_203227_792.jpg

I've been hoarding Kent Moore tools. Today I got this for the 360s front pinion seal. No more digging through old bearing races for me. At least for the 360s front pinion seals lol.
 

Hypnotoad

Well-Known Member
IllogicTC said:
My promised tool porn! It's not an exhaustive detailing of my little collection, but it covers most of the

Big Stanley set I've had for a while. Some of the pieces in this I have in other photos to provide more detail. This is my standard grab when I'm going to service something as it contains about 90% of what I'll end up using.


This is my old "quick-fix" set. They're not meant to be permanent, just something to get me to the store for a proper fix if wiring breaks or something. The fuses on the left are the full-size one and so are useless to me but maybe my neighbor will need one or something. I have a separate package of wire nuts besides the ones shown, mainly for house wiring and such. No clue where the wire strippers from this set

A Coleman Powermate set which was given to me. Needs a new battery as the current one doesn't hold charge for long. Includes a drill, circular saw, jigsaw and a lamp.


My in-car set. I don't usually keep much else in there to be honest though I should assemble a small emergency kit. A simple dial gauge for tire pressure as I don't trust the random ones on air pumps at convenience stores and such, and then my code reader.


An overview of my little tool corner. This is the last photo you'll see of it looking so

With the tray still

Tray removed


Ratchets and C-Clamps. The clamps are 3" and 4", a 6" one is a planned acquisition. Then a single 1/4 drive, 3 3/8 drives, and a 1/2 drive, topped off with one of those cheap-o 1/2 drive torque wrenches from HF.

More in the next post.
They all look so new! Don't you ever use those things?
 

djthumper

Administrator
Hypnotoad said:
They all look so new! Don't you ever use those things?
He bought them for show and tell... :lipsrsealed:
 

glfredrick

Well-Known Member
Oh, god... Don't get me started. I used to be a Snap On DEALER. :yes: :eek: :woot:

I walk on the truck these days and just go, "Got it, got it, got it, that would be nice, but who has $6000.00, got it, got it..."

My next big purchases will be a plasma cutter good for at least 1/2" stock, a metal lathe, and a modis. I'm pretty well covered on most everything else.
 

Hypnotoad

Well-Known Member
Nothing fits like a snap on. I don't own anything from snap on, but we used them in auto shop at tech school. I'll probably never own any either because I'm cheap. I sure do like using them though.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
I rented the 23 piece ball joint kit for my next task. maybe i should just invest in one....
 
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IllogicTC

IllogicTC

Well-Known Member
Hypnotoad said:
They all look so new! Don't you ever use those things?
Yes. One of the bit drivers has a bunch of crud on it that you can't really see, and one of the 3/8 ratchets still has some oil on it from my last OCI. I have a habit of trying to keep them wiped down after use, and not forcing anything harder than is needed, as you could screw the tool, or worse, the fastener. I'm all for hammering and whatnot if that's what's needed, but brute force isn't my go-to.

My roommate's parents used to live in this very house which is why he is in it to begin with (they moved out but kept the mortgage up). His dad did mechanical work and there's old rusty Craftsman and other various brands (many I've never heard of) laying around literally everywhere in the basement. Spring cleaning is planned for "some point in time" after which we may gather all those tools up in one area and then I'll snap some shots.


And that pinion seal installation tool reminds me of how I was told the maintenance guys install bearings on our machinery - just hammer 'em in. That's probably why the Greller welder drops its bearing about once every 1-2 months!
 

Hypnotoad

Well-Known Member
IllogicTC said:
Yes. One of the bit drivers has a bunch of crud on it that you can't really see, and one of the 3/8 ratchets still has some oil on it from my last OCI. I have a habit of trying to keep them wiped down after use, and not forcing anything harder than is needed, as you could screw the tool, or worse, the fastener. I'm all for hammering and whatnot if that's what's needed, but brute force isn't my go-to.
No need to explain, it was just a joke.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
BFH and concrete hammer drill were the brute force my call joint replacement required last night...kind of a necessary evil at times.
 

Mounce

Well-Known Member
Anyone interested in seeing an old metal working lathe? :wink: Idk if it really counts as a tool, but more of a machine.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
I would consider it a tool
 

Mounce

Well-Known Member
uploadfromtaptalk1400185967059.jpg shop is a mess but here she is. The rail on it goes out of frame on the right though. Idk much about it but my dad used to use it a lot when his little machine shop was in business. Flip a couple levers and the carriage moves on it's own or you can move it by hand, I wish I knew more about it to tell y'all, lol.

Dad about killed himself with it years ago, I was a child and was outside playing in the sand next to the shop then I heard him yelling and ran to him and his button up shirt was caught up in the shaft that moves the carriage and it was slowly winding his shirt up and pulling him in and had him bound up where that he couldn't turn it off and I was barely tall enough to reach the switch but got it turned off.
 

glfredrick

Well-Known Member
Hypnotoad said:
Nothing fits like a snap on. I don't own anything from snap on, but we used them in auto shop at tech school. I'll probably never own any either because I'm cheap. I sure do like using them though.
You will still pay, but it will be for parts that are broken off or rounded off (or in knuckles busted, aggravation in tools that do not fit, etc.).

There IS a difference and it is more than most people think, especially with many of the tools out there these days. Craftsman, for instance, is NOT your grandfather's Craftsman. Today's line is pure crud and one can do better with Harbor Freight unless they move to the "pro" line, which is essentially the same tool as Matco. I used to LOVE comparing tools on the tool truck... Had a whole bin of broken Craftsman and others... I would just warranty them out and break them again. For me, the proof is in rounding off a bolt with an inferior wrench then using a Snappy on the same bolt and twisting off the bolt, even though the head was rounded... Also, factory engineers generally build their vehicle platforms around Snap On tools and those fit in the difficult places for disasembly.
 

glfredrick

Well-Known Member
Mounce said:
Anyone interested in seeing an old metal working lathe? :wink: Idk if it really counts as a tool, but more of a machine.
Wish I had one! A friend does, so that meets my needs, but it would be great to have my own. I generally use them for making custom driveshafts, but there are a ton of other things one can do!
 

rmsg0040

Well-Known Member
Anything to minimize labour:

Milwaukee 3/8 and 1/2 impact wrenches, m12 cordless ratchet
ratcheting wrenches
knipex cobra pliers ( sears has them in black/red) - bite really well and are made in Germany
underhood light
impact swivels
impact magnetic sockets (great for engine work, no more bolts dropping)

keep an eye out on ebay or locally, many deals to be had,

here's a video link to my 3/8 Milwaukee impact:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8XsF2s6qQ0

older video of my toolbox contents:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orY3LewqSaY
 

glfredrick

Well-Known Member
HARDTRAILZ said:
I rented the 23 piece ball joint kit for my next task. maybe i should just invest in one....
I have two of the Harbor Freight presses. They are NOT Snap On, OTC, or some other major name brand, but they are also not over $300! I think that I got both of mine on sale for under $40 each. The reason I have two is that one is slightly tweaked from my doing something stupid (900 ft.lbs. of air gun torque against a cup wrongly placed -- no where to press, so something had to give) and I carry that one in my off-road rig for trail repairs -- they work awesome for doing u-joints on top of ball joints -- and the other is newer and still in great shape and I use it at home for, well, ball joints. I've done up to 1-ton Dodge with it, including the Trailblazer a couple of times. Works great if you get the cups aligned.

http://www.harborfreight.com/ball-joint-service-kit-for-2wd-and-4wd-vehicles-4065.html
 

Hypnotoad

Well-Known Member
glfredrick said:
I have two of the Harbor Freight presses. They are NOT Snap On, OTC, or some other major name brand, but they are also not over $300! I think that I got both of mine on sale for under $40 each. The reason I have two is that one is slightly tweaked from my doing something stupid (900 ft.lbs. of air gun torque against a cup wrongly placed -- no where to press, so something had to give) and I carry that one in my off-road rig for trail repairs -- they work awesome for doing u-joints on top of ball joints -- and the other is newer and still in great shape and I use it at home for, well, ball joints. I've done up to 1-ton Dodge with it, including the Trailblazer a couple of times. Works great if you get the cups aligned.

http://www.harborfreight.com/ball-joint-service-kit-for-2wd-and-4wd-vehicles-4065.html
This works on the lower ball joints of our trucks?
 

sawicksted

Well-Known Member
Here are my fav 2 kits...

The first one is a NAPA set...It fits in the floor storage of the cargo area easily and has everything I really need for most repairs. ( also goes on sale a couple of times a year for like $99. )
[sharedmedia=core:attachments:50900]
[sharedmedia=core:attachments:50899]

Also this little ratchet type "screw driver" because it ratchets and is very small.It will fit into very tight spaces. Also will take any standard bit from any set.

[sharedmedia=gallery:images:258]
[sharedmedia=gallery:images:257]
 

Hypnotoad

Well-Known Member
I've done plenty of ball joints, but have only found one set that will do the job from advance auto. That's cool harbor freight has a set that will work. The set you referenced looks to be an expansion set.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Advance was the set I rented
 

glfredrick

Well-Known Member
Hypnotoad said:
This works on the lower ball joints of our trucks?
Yup... I've done mine with it.

Ball joints are not as much problem as most people think. Just make sure you remove the SNAP RING first, then also make sure the cups are aligned properly so that you can actually press the joint out of its bore. Can do a side in under and hour with the press. Of course, I have a nice selection of high quality air tools, which speeds the process, but they are not required.

I have an expansion set of cups for the ball joint press, but never needed them for the TB.

And, for guys with real money, there is no other tool on the market that compares to the Snao On model. The cups and plates lock in place to make it a one-man task. SWEET piece of tool genius, it is! But the price reflects that...

Caution... Tool pron to follow:

http://store.snapon.com/Ball-Joint-Presses-Set-Master-Ball-Joint-Universal-Joint-Press-22-pcs--P644058.aspx
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Lowers have never pressed out of TB without drilling ball joint on my TB. Even with giant compressor and proper cups. They suck as many mentioned on here in recent weeks.
 

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