2H or A4WD what should you drive in?

fredhouse

Original poster
Member
Apr 17, 2012
37
Good afternoon,should you drive in 2H or AWD or does it even matter?The reason i ask is because if im in AWD and take a tight turn the tires feel like they skip and if in 2H its never done that.1 more question.Front right squeaks when you turn right and only right.sound goes away when you go back straight.Thank you for your help.2003 trailblazer ext v8
The options i have are 2H,AWD,4H and 4L
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
Never use auto unless you are driving on a slippery surface. The shock loads on the drivetrain are not good.
 

Denali n DOO

Member
May 22, 2012
5,596
my switch offers 2H, auto, 4H and 4L. I drive in 2H and believe you should only drive 4H on surfaces that have some slip like snow, ice, rain, gravel, dirt. 2H will give better gas mileage as well I believe. I didn't know AWD vehicles offered 2H??
 

Voymom

Member
Feb 3, 2012
2,523
fredhouse said:
Good afternoon,should you drive in 2H or AWD or does it even matter?The reason i ask is because if im in AWD and take a tight turn the tires feel like they skip and if in 2H its never done that.1 more question.Front right squeaks when you turn right and only right.sound goes away when you go back straight.Thank you for your help.2003 trailblazer ext v8

The reason why the tires seem to skip during a tight turn in AWD is because the turning radius in AWD is minimized compared to 2HI. As far as the right squeaking when you turn, I couldn't tell you, all sorts of things can happen and make noises when their breaking or broken. Hopefully someone more equipped to answer can chime in. I'm still learning so I don't have all the answers lol. I'm also very sure about the turning radius being minimized in AWD. I have 4x4 and it's difficult to make a tight turn when it is activated compared to it being turned off.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
Voymom said:
The reason why the tires seem to skip during a tight turn in AWD is because the turning radius in AWD is minimized compared to 2HI. I'm also very sure about the turning radius being minimized in AWD. I have 4x4 and it's difficult to make a tight turn when it is activated compared to it being turned off.

Huh...

The turning radius is the same.
 

Voymom

Member
Feb 3, 2012
2,523
HARDTRAILZ said:
Huh...

The turning radius is the same.

Hmm...I was always told that a vehicle in AWD or 4WD it is harder to make a tight turn compared to a vehicle that is not AWD. I know with the envoy in 4H it is harder for me to make a tight turn compared to being in "regular" mode or 2WD. I had the same issue with the Buick rendezvous even with it being auto 4x4, and with a jeep cherokee in 4wd.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
It is harder to turn, but the turning radius doesnt change. You are fighting the front tires being powered vs them just rolling along, but the turning radius is not determined by that. It still turns as sharp. In the snow or sand or mud you will not notice the difficulty turning in 4x4 because the tires can slip some. I NEVER use 4x4 on pavement.
 

Voymom

Member
Feb 3, 2012
2,523
HARDTRAILZ said:
It is harder to turn, but the turning radius doesnt change. You are fighting the front tires being powered vs them just rolling along, but the turning radius is not determined by that. It still turns as sharp. In the snow or sand or mud you will not notice the difficulty turning in 4x4 because the tires can slip some. I NEVER use 4x4 on pavement.

I have only used 4x4 once last winter when they didn't plow snow on the roads here. The rendezvous kicked in all the time, and with the jeep it was the same way. I know not to use the 4x4 on pavement. I did however use it once very briefly when I test drove it to make sure it worked. Other than that it's never used.

I'm not arguing with you, I think I just misunderstood what I was told before. I tried an 04 envoy before buying this one, and when I test drove it, it was already in 4x4 as it was driven out of a huge snow drift, and the 4x4 wasn't turned off. When I went to make a left hand turn on the highway I got the skipping as well. I brought it to the attention of the salesman and he told me it was due to the turning radius being minimized when 4x4 is activated. So that's where I got the info. I never really considered researching it because I hardly ever had to use 4x4. But I did just do a search and you are correct Kyle, the search said that the skipping is the tires catching from to much traction, and if it's done often(driving on dry pavement) it could screw up the drivetrain.

So I apologize, I was indeed wrong or misinformed. Thank you for clarifying.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
Voymom said:
I brought it to the attention of the salesman and he told me it was due to the turning radius being minimized when 4x4 is activated.

Salesmen are never a reliable source of mechanical info. Better off to ask a dog. At least the dog wont flat out lie to you.
 

ScarabEpic22

Member
Nov 20, 2011
728
Honestly A4WD is worthless, just reduces your gas mileage and adds wear to your drivetrain. There is NO reason to use anything other than 2HI when driving on pavement, if its just wet and you're slipping, then you need to get better tires. I havent used A4WD on my 02 in a long time after I read up about how it engages the front axle at 5-10% then moves power forward if the rear slips. Shock loads the front diff and axles, not exactly good because our front diffs are weak to begin with. I used to use it if there was some snow/slush on the road at highway speeds, now that I have good tires (read not Toyo Open Country A/Ts), I dont have a problem to begin with. If its really snowy, slow down and use 4HI.
 

AtlWrk

Member
Dec 6, 2011
674
fredhouse said:
Good afternoon,should you drive in 2H or AWD or does it even matter?The reason i ask is because if im in AWD and take a tight turn the tires feel like they skip and if in 2H its never done that.1 more question.Front right squeaks when you turn right and only right.sound goes away when you go back straight.Thank you for your help.2003 trailblazer ext v8

Auto mode should be avoided whenever possible (which is always). The Auto mode is essentially 4HI with the transfer case clutches only engaged to about 5% (essentially sending no power to the front wheels). When a wheel slip is detected the transfer case (often unexpectedly) engages its clutches to provide full power to both the front and rear wheels. Many see this sudden slamming of power as potentially harmful to the drivetrain.

Also, in any mode other than 2HI you're driving more components in the front differential, front prop shaft and transfer case--leading to unnecessary wear in the bearings and seals. This also consumes gas.

Basically: If conditions warrant 4 wheel drive, use 4HI and if they do not, use 2HI.

Roadie has a great detailed explanation of why the front wheels skip, or "crow hop" as we sometimes call it, and further explanation of why any 4wd mode should only be used in sufficiently slippery conditions.


EDIT: gah! beat by less than a minute
 

The_Roadie

Lifetime VIP Donor
Member
Nov 19, 2011
9,957
Portland, OR
I see I was late to this party, but my thoughts have been echoed.

Only thing to add is that ANY vehicle that exhibits crow-hopping in A4WD mode while driving slowly on dry pavement (please everybody use the correct term A4WD), has a grabby transfer case that needs to be serviced. Since the service interval is a surprisingly short 50K miles, lots of transfer cases out there are in DIRE need of new fluid. And if the fluid hasn't been changed, the clutches can be damaged and many of them exhibit crow-hopping when they should be relatively free-wheeling.

All of our vehicles will crow-hop on dry pavement in 4HI and 4LO, but they should not in A4WD.

My GMC sales-scum claimed Envoys had better "quality" on the assembly line than those Chevy's. :confused: I bought the vehicle from his lying ass anyway, but I should have just punched him and walked out. :hissyfit:
 

Jkust

Member
Dec 4, 2011
946
Well let's see, both of my 360's are always in A4WD with no option to switch. What I will say is if I had the option to put it in to 2Hi in the summer for commuting I would. While I haven't had any issues of anything wearing out, it robs me of around 1mpg. In the winter here in MN where when we get snow, it stays the entire 5 months in the form of ice on the side streets and secondary roads as opposed to melting at all in many of the other snow states, it is great to have. Of course you can't stop any faster but the stabilitrac system combined with the A4WD plus the traction control system makes it seam like you are driving on a dry summertime road while in the absolute worst snow conditions. Calling A4WD useless given the extreme onroad and towing I do, just makes no sense. Useless as your fireplace in the summer...yes, useless while pulling 6000lbs of boat up a 45 degree ramp with slime from heavy use or pushing through a couple feet of snow with your snowmobile trailer in tow...no
 

The_Roadie

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Nov 19, 2011
9,957
Portland, OR
Jkust said:
Well let's see, both of my 360's are always in A4WD with no option to switch...
But I'm sure you went into the transaction knowing that, and you didn't have a mission that needed a low range. It's the non-enthusiast numb-nuts who buy a vehicle with the NVG226 transfer case, put it permanently into A4WD thinking it's like a Subaru or something designed to have all the time AWD, then never check their transfer case level and burn them out :crazy: - those are the folks who need an education. :biggrin: Not our fine members here. :yes:
 
Dec 4, 2011
520
WOW really like it when a thread get going so quickly.

I would like to add my thoughts.

The reason you get crow hopping in 4HI and 4LO is the Front Diff is locked up and the turning radius of the FRONT wheels is different. Whether you turn left or right the inside wheel is on the short radius and the outside is on the long radius. Since the diff is locked the wheels turn at the same rate but travel different distances therefore the crow hop to catch up or slow down. This is the reason that dry pavement is not a good place to run 4HI or 4LO, puts undo stress on components. In A4WD the transfer case determines what mode you are in so you may or may not be in 4 wheel drive depending upon traction. If you are loose stuff (snow, mud, gravel etc.) the wheels crow hop but you can't feel it because they slip.

This is my understanding of how the front ends acts in 4HI or 4LO, I look forward to more discussion on this.:twocents:
 

ScarabEpic22

Member
Nov 20, 2011
728
Jkust said:
Well let's see, both of my 360's are always in A4WD with no option to switch. What I will say is if I had the option to put it in to 2Hi in the summer for commuting I would. While I haven't had any issues of anything wearing out, it robs me of around 1mpg. In the winter here in MN where when we get snow, it stays the entire 5 months in the form of ice on the side streets and secondary roads as opposed to melting at all in many of the other snow states, it is great to have. Of course you can't stop any faster but the stabilitrac system combined with the A4WD plus the traction control system makes it seam like you are driving on a dry summertime road while in the absolute worst snow conditions. Calling A4WD useless given the extreme onroad and towing I do, just makes no sense. Useless as your fireplace in the summer...yes, useless while pulling 6000lbs of boat up a 45 degree ramp with slime from heavy use or pushing through a couple feet of snow with your snowmobile trailer in tow...no

But yours have different xfer cases and spline disconnects (as in no disconnect, think thats the name) up front that are designed to run all the time. Just like the TBSS, it has a different xfer case than everything but the 9-7X Aero but I imagine they shares the front axle spline setup as the Bravada, Rainier, and regular 9-7Xs.

Honestly if I cant pull my boat out of the ramp in 2HI in my 02, Ill go 4HI right away. Not even worth stopping at A4WD. Only had to go 4LO once or twice in low water late in the season where the ramp was really slippery. Never had a problem with the SS even with the crappy stock tires, just give it a little more gas and out they come.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
RedEnvoyDenali said:
WOW really like it when a thread get going so quickly.

I would like to add my thoughts.

The reason you get crow hopping in 4HI and 4LO is the Front Diff is locked up and the turning radius of the FRONT wheels is different. Whether you turn left or right the inside wheel is on the short radius and the outside is on the long radius. Since the diff is locked the wheels turn at the same rate but travel different distances therefore the crow hop to catch up or slow down. This is the reason that dry pavement is not a good place to run 4HI or 4LO, puts undo stress on components. In A4WD the transfer case determines what mode you are in so you may or may not be in 4 wheel drive depending upon traction. If you are loose stuff (snow, mud, gravel etc.) the wheels crow hop but you can't feel it because they slip.

This is my understanding of how the front ends acts in 4HI or 4LO, I look forward to more discussion on this.:twocents:

Nope. Our front diffs dont lock. One wheel gets power not both.
 

The_Roadie

Lifetime VIP Donor
Member
Nov 19, 2011
9,957
Portland, OR
Yep. The crow-hopping is NOT from a locked front or rear diff. It's caused by the lockup of the TRANSFER CASE combined with the different distance from the differentials to the turning point. In A4WD the transfer case should not be locked up until wheel slip is detected, so crow-hopping in A4WD is a sign of a transfer case failure.

I did this diagram years ago to explain the math. The secret is to realize that an open diff does not allow slippage from side to side without limits if the driveshaft is being locked to another driveshaft - the differential AVERAGES the RPM from side to side. Because of the different turning radii, the front and rear driveshafts WANT to turn at different RPMs but the transfer case won't let them.

A true AWD drivetrain design allows for transfer case slippage all the time. In 4HI and 4LO we have no slippage.

envoyturning.jpg
 
Dec 4, 2011
520
the roadie said:
Yep. The crow-hopping is NOT from a locked front or rear diff. It's caused by the lockup of the TRANSFER CASE combined with the different distance from the differentials to the turning point. In A4WD the transfer case should not be locked up until wheel slip is detected, so crow-hopping in A4WD is a sign of a transfer case failure.

I did this diagram years ago to explain the math. The secret is to realize that an open diff does not allow slippage from side to side without limits if the driveshaft is being locked to another driveshaft - the differential AVERAGES the RPM from side to side. Because of the different turning radii, the front and rear driveshafts WANT to turn at different RPMs but the transfer case won't let them.

A true AWD drivetrain design allows for transfer case slippage all the time. In 4HI and 4LO we have no slippage.

envoyturning.jpg

Thank you Roadie as usual you explain the different turning radius much more eloquently than I did.

Am I using the wrong term for Crow Hopping? Should I have said slippage. My son owned an All Wheel Drive Jeep Cherokee and when you turn it on loose surface it would always slip the front wheels. In addition I had an occasion to try and determine if my Transfer case switch was working on a Jimmy. My mechanic went to a gravel area and turned sharp, the front wheels slipped and therefor the transfer case was locking up - no charge
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
RedEnvoyDenali said:
the turning radius of the FRONT wheels is different.

You had the radius being different correct, but it is front and rear not the front only. If you locked it in 4x4 and removed the rear driveshaft you would not get crow-hop.


the roadie said:
Yep. The crow-hopping is NOT from a locked front or rear diff.

What is the terms for my rear tire slipping when the rear is locked under power with the lock right? Just tire slip or is there a fancy name? I call it locker-skip, but there is prolly something better.

RedEnvoyDenali said:
Thank you Roadie as usual you explain the different turning radius much more eloquently than I did.

Am I using the wrong term for Crow Hopping?

You were using the wrong radius's in your explanation, but crow-hopping is the term for the binding between front and rear when turned in 4x4.


RedEnvoyDenali said:
My mechanic went to a gravel area and turned sharp, the front wheels slipped and therefor the transfer case was locking up - no charge

Good mechanic! Glad he did not BS you and try to take advantage. Nice to see some will still use common sense.
 

Jkust

Member
Dec 4, 2011
946
the roadie said:
But I'm sure you went into the transaction knowing that, and you didn't have a mission that needed a low range. It's the non-enthusiast numb-nuts who buy a vehicle with the NVG226 transfer case, put it permanently into A4WD thinking it's like a Subaru or something designed to have all the time AWD, then never check their transfer case level and burn them out :crazy: - those are the folks who need an education. :biggrin: Not our fine members here. :yes:

Correct, never needed and hopefully never will need low range. If I had my druthers I'd have wanted all of the 360's to have selectable 4wd. Truthfully, I'm a little suprised how capable the A4wd is given the challenges I present. My main tow rig, the Rainier, has some nice tires that had 0 miles when I bought it and I know how much benefit decent tires are. Some of my A4wd satisfaction is likely related to to the tires in certain towing situations.
 

The_Roadie

Lifetime VIP Donor
Member
Nov 19, 2011
9,957
Portland, OR
HARDTRAILZ said:
What is the terms for my rear tire slipping when the rear is locked under power with the lock right? Just tire slip or is there a fancy name? I call it locker-skip, but there is prolly something better.
Excellent question, and I don't know (and didn't find one in a quick search). I might call it tire scrub or scuffing, but not having the lock-right or an e-locker, I never needed to discuss the phenomenon before.
 
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HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
CaptainXL said:
Preload?

edit: oh..a powertrax lock-right. Free wheelin I think

Huh? I have a Ptrx Lock-right and when it is locked and I go around a tight corner the inside tire scrubs or skips. If unlocked it ratchets and you here it click as the two halves pass each other.
 

CaptainXL

Member
Dec 4, 2011
2,445
HARDTRAILZ said:
Huh? I have a Ptrx Lock-right and when it is locked and I go around a tight corner the inside tire scrubs or skips. If unlocked it ratchets and you here it click as the two halves pass each other.

You sure about that? Its normally the outside tire that your dragging around because it has to travel a larger arc.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
Positive. The inside tire binds then breaks traction much like a mini burnout.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
Truetrac...Limited Slip

Zexel Torsen...Limited Slip

LockRight--Locker. When locked it is just like a spool.

You are talking about completely different things.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
From Marlin Crawler's website....

"For example, if you are driving in the city and you turn a corner while accelerating, the locker will automatically engage causing both tires to rotate at the same speed. Your truck will likely chirp it's inside tire which may cause oversteer."
 
Feb 24, 2012
133
My truck has AWD, 2H 4H and 4L. When I first got it if I used AWD it would shudder on turns. I looked into this and found that it meant the transfer case fluid needed to be changed. In my truck it's a special fluid "Auto-Trak II" you can only get from GM (not very expensive). I changed the fluid and AWD works perfectly now.

That said, I use 2H whenever it's dry and AWD when it's wet roads or snow. I never use 4H. If I am offroad and it's slick I use 4L.

I use AWD when it's wet because this beast has so much power it will kick the back out easily on a turn. I know full well how to control a powerslide in the rain, and occasionally do it on purpose :wootwoot: but my wife would be surprised. So I just set these rules and stick by it, and it works for us.

Not sure if the -360 has autotrak fluid in the T-case, but if it does it's worth trying a fluid change.
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
deekster_caddy said:
My truck has AWD, 2H 4H and 4L. When I first got it if I used AWD it would shudder on turns. I looked into this and found that it meant the transfer case fluid needed to be changed. In my truck it's a special fluid "Auto-Trak II" you can only get from GM (not very expensive). I changed the fluid and AWD works perfectly now..


All 360/370's require same AutoTrac II.

deekster_caddy said:
That said, I use 2H whenever it's dry and AWD when it's wet roads or snow. I never use 4H. If I am offroad and it's slick I use 4L..

Read the thread and you might want to change how you are using the settings. Only use low if you need the gear reduction.


deekster_caddy said:
I use AWD when it's wet because this beast has so much power it will kick the back out easily on a turn. I know full well how to control a powerslide in the rain, and occasionally do it on purpose :wink: but my wife would be surprised. So I just set these rules and stick by it, and it works for us.

Not good on your truck....as I said read the thread and see why you dont want to be using AWD...
 
Feb 24, 2012
133
HARDTRAILZ said:
Not good on your truck....as I said read the thread and see why you dont want to be using AWD...

So why is it there? I did read the thread, and it doesn't change anything I know about the AWD transfer case in this truck.

I don't see any reason not to use AWD. Besides the 'why is it there in the first place' question, I personally would have no problem if the thing were left in AWD year round, even on the dry stuff, purely for safety. Yes, the transfer case fluid may need to be changed more frequently, but that's what it is there for. If you create a low-traction situation (the 8.1 is good at that), you have traction anyway. I have no difference in MPG (8.1 doesn't care) and my truck does not 'shock' the front axle. In fact, it's completely seamless when you engage the front. If I didn't know the same maneuver would kick it out in 2H I wouldn't have known the front was engaged at all! I have an intersection near my work that requires a heavy throttle acceleration during a left turn (they really need a traffic light there!) if you ever want to get home. If the roads are wet, I will powerslide into the lane every time (the younguns call that drifiting!). If I use AWD, it just goes.

I DO use 2H for most driving.

It's interesting, in an unplowed snowy parking lot I can easily do donuts in 2H, and in 4H I can drift it around all kinds of ways, but in AWD it will not slide. It just drives in a circle. I believe there is some traction control/stability control at work in this thing when it's in Auto.

I use 4L offroad to keep good control over my speed. If I'm in a place where I need the transfer case locked, I also have no reason to be going over 15-20 MPH. I realize that may not apply to all people/situations. I did use 4H once on an unplowed highway during a snowstorm. But I find AWD does very well in most slippery situations.

I also use 4L in my garage to climb ramps. I do this just to exercise the transfer case so I know it will still engage when I need it.

Thank you for the advice, but I prefer to use it the way "They" say you can use it. I'll continue using AWD the way I do, and will certainly report in when my transfer case clutches are worn out, or my front universals blow up. Right now it's got 130K miles on it and everything is working fine. Also remember I've got a 2500 truck, things in there are made of stronger stuff...
 

Jkust

Member
Dec 4, 2011
946
deekster_caddy said:
It's . I believe there is some traction control/stability control at work in this thing when it's in Auto.

...

I think you hit it on the head. It's tough to force the car in a circle even on a sheet of ice with the stability control active.
 

ScarabEpic22

Member
Nov 20, 2011
728
Ah see now we're getting a fullsize truck with a completely different transfer case setup talking about the TrailBlazer/Voy xfer case. GM has done a lot of weird things over the years so whats applicable to your truck isnt necessary applicable to ours.

And its not really AWD, its A4WD. Think of it as RWD that engages the front end IF (and ONLY IF) the rear end slips. Other than that, its essentially RWD. (If you really want to get technical, on the GMT360/370/305s the front is engaged at 5-10% in A4WD mode.)


If you're powersliding in the rain on an on ramp, you need better tires. Read my previous post, there is NO reason any truck (midsize SUV, fullsize SUV, or fullsize Silvy/Sierra) should need to use A4WD in rain. Period. If you're spinning out in the rain, get better tires that can actually grip properly. I had this same problem back in 05-07 on my 02 TrailBlazer and had to use A4WD in the rain [against my better judgement]. Want to guess what the solution was? New tires. Ditched the barely half-worn Toyo Open Country A/Ts that never gripped properly in the rain for some Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revos. Never had an issue again. Your results may vary, but seriously consider getting better tires if you're having to drive around in A4WD in the rain.
 
Feb 24, 2012
133
ScarabEpic22 said:
Ah see now we're getting a fullsize truck with a completely different transfer case setup talking about the TrailBlazer/Voy xfer case. GM has done a lot of weird things over the years so whats applicable to your truck isnt necessary applicable to ours.

Absolutely. I apologize if I wasn't more clear about that. It's in my signature.
 
Feb 24, 2012
133
ScarabEpic22 said:
If you're powersliding in the rain on an on ramp, you need better tires. Read my previous post, there is NO reason any truck (midsize SUV, fullsize SUV, or fullsize Silvy/Sierra) should need to use A4WD in rain. Period. If you're spinning out in the rain, get better tires that can actually grip properly. I had this same problem back in 05-07 on my 02 TrailBlazer and had to use A4WD in the rain [against my better judgement]. Want to guess what the solution was? New tires. Ditched the barely half-worn Toyo Open Country A/Ts that never gripped properly in the rain for some Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revos. Never had an issue again. Your results may vary, but seriously consider getting better tires if you're having to drive around in A4WD in the rain.

I read your post. I have had a few different tires on my trucks over the years. It's not like I'm wildly fishtailing, or hydroplaning. I also never mentioned an onramp. But when I leave a stop sign in the rain, if I give it too much throttle, I can spin the tires easily in 2H. I'm not new to this phenomenon, I've been driving big block cars all my life. I know how to handle it. It happens with new or old tires, good or cheap. Tires aren't going to make any noticeable difference when you put the pedal down too far with 500 ft lb of torque on tap and the pavement is wet. My '73 Buick LeSabre w/ 455 does this. My '86 Burb w/ 455 did this. My '05 Yukon w/ 496 does this. Other large V8 vehicles I've had over the years do this. But in the Yukon if I press that little AWD button, it just goes on it's way in control, without spinning, no matter where I point the steering wheel. Maybe a 5.3 or 6.0 won't have this problem, but the 8.1 will spin just about any tire from any stop sign if I want it to.

Against your better judgement, I will continue to use it, and advise my wife to do the same. I'd rather change the transfer case fluid more than have her hit the gas and 'whoops' into oncoming traffic with 5 kids in the back, just because she had to goose it across a busy intersection. Transfer case clutches are a lot cheaper than hospital bills.
 

ScarabEpic22

Member
Nov 20, 2011
728
deekster_caddy said:
I read your post. I have had a few different tires on my trucks over the years. It's not like I'm wildly fishtailing, or hydroplaning. I also never mentioned an onramp. But when I leave a stop sign in the rain, if I give it too much throttle, I can spin the tires easily in 2H. I'm not new to this phenomenon, I've been driving big block cars all my life. I know how to handle it. It happens with new or old tires, good or cheap. Tires aren't going to make any noticeable difference when you put the pedal down too far with 500 ft lb of torque on tap and the pavement is wet. My '73 Buick LeSabre w/ 455 does this. My '86 Burb w/ 455 did this. My '05 Yukon w/ 496 does this. Other large V8 vehicles I've had over the years do this. But in the Yukon if I press that little AWD button, it just goes on it's way in control, without spinning, no matter where I point the steering wheel. Maybe a 5.3 or 6.0 won't have this problem, but the 8.1 will spin just about any tire from any stop sign if I want it to.

Against your better judgement, I will continue to use it, and advise my wife to do the same. I'd rather change the transfer case fluid more than have her hit the gas and 'whoops' into oncoming traffic with 5 kids in the back, just because she had to goose it across a busy intersection. Transfer case clutches are a lot cheaper than hospital bills.

I apologize for the onramp comment, I assumed that entering a highway was done via a left turn onto an onramp.

Do whatever you want, its your vehicle. As I mentioned before, your truck has a completely different transfer case setup than the TB/Voys do so what works on your truck might not work on ours. To further my point, and also partially agree with you, my ex-gf had an 02 Burb with the 5.3. I told her to use A4WD whenever it was rainy out because the back end would slide out on her too, even with new tires. She drove like a grandma too. But, her Burb didnt engage the transfer case in a jerking motion as my TB does, so I wasnt worried about shock-loading the transfer case. If yours doesnt lurch forward after the rear slips and smoothly engages the front end, then Im jealous and wish GM would have done that for my 02 TB.
 

n0kfb

Member
Dec 8, 2011
104
HARDTRAILZ said:
Nope. Our front diffs dont lock. One wheel gets power not both.

The first part of this statement is true; our front differentials do not lock.

The second part is not true - both wheels are powered.

Our front differential provides power to BOTH wheels when both wheels have sufficient traction. If one wheel looses traction on snow, ice, sand or what have you, toque equal to the available traction on the wheel with less traction is sent to both wheels.

-- Dan Meyer :steer:

Sorry about hijacking the thread...
 

HARDTRAILZ

Moderator
Nov 18, 2011
49,665
And as soon as you turn the traction is unequal and one gets power... spun the front tires enough to know they hardly ever are both powered.
 

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