03 TB Power steering pressure line replacement

JimShoe

Original poster
Member
Sep 3, 2012
16
Still trying to replace prssure side power steering line. The new pressure line is exactly the same as the old except the fitting that fits into the rack and pinion side is larger (.472in. vs. .378 in.). Won't fit as things are. The instructions on the new and improved line say to remove the inner seals and nothing more. My question is does anyone know how to remove the inner seals?
Jim
 

JerryIrons

Member
Dec 20, 2011
434
Jim I wrote an article submission on changing out a power steering rack, and I talk a little about the after market lines:


>>To even add to the confusion, if you are using a new aftermarket high pressure line, like I did the first time, the >>after market lines are actually bigger in diameter than the original lines, and do NOT use any seals, they are big >>enough already and won't go in if the seal is in!

On mine the old seals stuck to the line, you can even see a pic in my article submission. Look closely at the old line I bet they stuck to it. If not I don't think they were that hard to get out. One of those hooky tools, like a screwdriver bent at the end in a C...

I am trying to go by memory here, it has been a couple of years or so, the new aftermarket line came with an o-ring on it?
 

JimShoe

Original poster
Member
Sep 3, 2012
16
Jerry,
Great article, clear and detailed. Thanks. Part of my seals are still in the plate of the rack and pinion. I was able to tear the rubber part of the seal off and didn't realize there was another part. If I get a hook in the hole is there a lip that it can hook to? I tore the rubber gasket part off the return line opening, could that be a problem?
 

JerryIrons

Member
Dec 20, 2011
434
Those seals are metal rings, filled with a rubber interior. When you insert an original oem line they puncture the rubber material. So you have to get out the metal ring/rubber around it combination. Hook, screwdriver, etc. Is the return line a bigger diameter also? Just curious. I repaired my return line instead of replacing it when that blew out on me.
 

JimShoe

Original poster
Member
Sep 3, 2012
16
On the return line from the rack I reused the metal section of the line that connected to the rack and just attached a clamped hose. So not sure about the diameter of the replacement line. Got the new seal from Chevy dealer for the return ($21)Ouch. They had it and I needed it. To pull the seals I used a slide hammer with a screw with the head facing away from the slide hammer. The screw head had a sharp edge. I was able to get screw head into rack opening and pushed sideways to catch the back edge of the seal and used the handle of the slide hammer to pull the seal. It took a few tries. Thought I heard a chorus singing halleluah when they finally popped. Your information and article were vital in getting this far. THANKS.
Jim :smile:
 

tblazerdude

Member
Dec 4, 2011
321
I had a similar problem, and I will throw in my 0.02. Under the rubber grommet that goes over the driver side strut I had a power steering leak.

1. Remove grommet and clean up with brake cleaner.
2. Determine which line(s) are leaking.
Mine was the line closest to me (away from the engine block), which I believe to be the return line. This line generally has less pressure (100-300psi).
3. Purchase mini-hacksaw, high quality hose clamp assortment, and 3/8 inner diameter fuel pressure hose. (usually the highest quality hose autozone/advance has)
4. Cut bad portion of PS line out with mini hack saw. (Usually just the portion under the Grommet, where moisture was held.)
5. Attach fuel line hose to ends of PS line and double hose clamp it.
6. Test, by starting the engine.

So far, this one day fix to get me buy has lasted, and that was done in April of 2012.

This is a temporary fix and is not recommended for permanent replacement. I don't think I would try it on the send line (300-500psi).
 

JerryIrons

Member
Dec 20, 2011
434
Funny how the oddest things on a car repair bring you to a screeching halt, eh? Been there myself! At least one person has read my article haha. :smile: Good idea you had there with the screw and slidehammer!

I think patching a return line with rubber line is a permanent fix. I did the same myself, except I flared the metal end of the tube before running rubber hose (high pressure oil transmission hose or that fuel hose too i think) and double clamped it. Actually in my environment the rubber may last longer than the metal line that rusts away. For the high pressure line yeah I would put in a new line. (and did)
 

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