Dual Airflow CAI?

CaptainXL

Member
Dec 4, 2011
2,445
DenaliHD66 said:
I wonder if there is a reason why I've never seen this concept before...

Because it doesn't work. The only way to get more air into your engine is to boost. Turbo or blower.
 

harmless

Member
Nov 21, 2011
2,049
Wow. Some companies really like to take advantage of their target market's stupidity and ignorance of how things work, don't they?! :eek:


Shamefull. :lipsrsealed:
 

limequat

Member
Dec 8, 2011
520
I could actually see something like this helping low end torque. It's hard to tell how it works from what what they show, but it if it could dynamically switch from one tube diameter to another it could work. The 3x airflow claim is just ridiculous though.
 

DenaliHD66

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
597
I want to say the maker was K&N, but maybe not. I saw an electric cold air intake supercharger before, which would fit the 4.2L. It ran for about $400, and I think it just had like an electric fan located inside the tube. I could see that helping the low end but since it was electric, it probably just fed air in at the same rate all the time.
 

Pittdawg

Member
Dec 5, 2011
538

DenaliHD66

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
597
That looks legit actually, and it says UP TO 15 HP increase, so its not like they are trying to pull a fast one. They also show how it works. I think just installing an e-fan would be more beneficial though.
 

harmless

Member
Nov 21, 2011
2,049
Didn't we put that electricintaketurbothingamabob to rest in some other thread? :lipsrsealed:

I think it had headlight fluid in it too... :crazy:
 

ItsOnVoy

Member
Nov 21, 2011
2,401
:eek::eek: Ill take 6 of those bad boys!

:no::no::no::no::no::no::no:
 

Ghost

Member
Jun 1, 2012
932
This thread is a crack up:rotfl:
 

kardain

Member
Dec 16, 2011
557
That is not a CAI.... Just sayin.

A true cai does not terminate in the engine compartment.
 

harmless

Member
Nov 21, 2011
2,049
kardain said:
That is not a CAI.... Just sayin.

A true cai does not terminate in the engine compartment.

Or begin in one.


For that matter, the only TRUE "cold air" intake would only exist in places like Nunavut, Alaska, the North or South Poles or Northern Ontario (in winter time).

Such a bogus myth.

Technically they should be called "cooler air" intakes as they (in theory) suck up the ambient air from the outside of the engine compartment which is slightly cooler than the stuff found under the hood, which, also in theory get warmed up ANYWAYS because it travels in a plastic or metal tube THROUGH all that hot under-hood air to get to the engine...

I don't get how peeps who live in Florida, Texas, California or even across the ocean in the desert lands can fall for a "cold air" intake. Where do you find COLD AIR in those kinds of environments?

Seriously. :crazy:

You wanna prevent heat soak? Get the air directly from the outside source into the engine with the least amount of travel.

pow0227a.jpg


^^ NO heat soak there (at speed)! :biggrin:
 

DenaliHD66

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
597
They are always better than stock, and they suck in more air regardless of the temperature. The universal applications could be upfitted better for a ram-air system or better protected against the heat from the engine. Just saying... OEM intakes are usually very conservative.
 

kardain

Member
Dec 16, 2011
557
harmless said:
Or begin in one.


<snip>

pow0227a.jpg


^^ NO heat soak there (at speed)! :biggrin:

True that... I suppose that it is just the natural evolution of the English lexicon to call any aftermarket intake a CAI, much like Kleenex being a generic term for facial tissue....

Now, as for the pic... So that's where I left my spare engine :biggrin:
 

Ghost

Member
Jun 1, 2012
932
harmless said:
You wanna prevent heat soak? Get the air directly from the outside source into the engine with the least amount of travel.

pow0227a.jpg


^^ NO heat soak there (at speed)! :biggrin:

That is one badass GTO !
 

Ghost

Member
Jun 1, 2012
932
Uncle Blazer said:
pow0227a.jpg



slow down! Your car is on fire!!

Must be the tuning of the velocity stack that makes it cost $270

Hey now, them custom flame paint jobs add 100+HP !
 

Ghost

Member
Jun 1, 2012
932
DenaliHD66 said:
Lol seriously? If so, let us know how it works out.

Was the 11" rice cooker included ?
 

DenaliHD66

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
597
Ace1875 said:

Lol @ this response on there:


The headlight fluid reservoir is located next to the horn oil pan, right below the rear transmission on a new Prius. When changing headlight fluid, make sure someone checks the differentials in your dash light that lets you know your headlight fluid is low. It could be that the fluid leaked from your waternator, but you never know unless you get that checked out, too.
And remember, with the new Prius, you may want to avoid parking on a hill because the "park" only locks the flywheel, not the other three wheels. That could be due to the fact that the Prius has a 3 stroke engine.
You might want to get it looked at ASAP. Lots of potential problems.
 

harmless

Member
Nov 21, 2011
2,049
DenaliHD66 said:
They are always better than stock, and they suck in more air regardless of the temperature. The universal applications could be upfitted better for a ram-air system or better protected against the heat from the engine. Just saying... OEM intakes are usually very conservative.

I would like to point something out to the masses at this period of time since this comment finally showed up...

1 - It is the engine that sucks in the air as required. The air intake is just a hose that directs the air. Higher trottle demand = higher air intake. Getting a tube that's smaller than OEM or has a bunch of crap in it that blocks airflow (in any way shape or form) may choke the engine out thus causing response issues. You want better airflow, widen the tube. You breathe better with your mouth open while running than you would sucking through a straw, correct? Same principal.
(this is for naturally aspirated airflow, of course)

2 - OEM intakes are designed to function properly to the engine specifications. No bells, no whistles, just plain jane function. All the aftermarket for the most part, just adds bling and a fancy name to a tube that pretty much does the same shit. It's like saying that the new pair of running shoes you just bought will make that fat ass of yours run better. Though some of that may be a little true, you're still fat and will perform as such.

3 - Ram air. The boys on the Corvette forum said it best so I'm going to link to them.
Corvette Forums: Ram air - Myth or Truth.

:coffee:
 

DenaliHD66

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
597
So what causes the noise under my hood when I accelerate? Couldn't be all that extra air being sucked in at a faster rate... Also after I installed it, what caused my truck to gain about 10 horsepower? I don't get it, I thought cold air intakes don't work? Why is mine the only exception to this rule?
 

kardain

Member
Dec 16, 2011
557
DenaliHD66 said:
So what causes the noise under my hood when I accelerate? Couldn't be all that extra air being sucked in at a faster rate... Also after I installed it, what caused my truck to gain about 10 horsepower? I don't get it, I thought cold air intakes don't work? Why is mine the only exception to this rule?

Aftermarket air intakes are noisy. Rubber (oem) is a nice sound insulator, as is the stock air box.

The air intake rate is marginally increased. This is due to less turbulence (smooth pipe vs corrugated).

The hp increase is also due to the reduced turbulence. Like with efans, the increase isn't an increase, but a reclamation of lost hp due to part design.

On edit:

I only brought up the terminology for one reason... In the tuner car scene, there is a difference between the intake depicted in the OP and a cold air intake. The link depicts a short ram or warm air intake. A cold air intake for your everyday passenger vehicle has the filter and intake end outside the engine bay. They are either placed in front of the fender (behind the front bumper cover) or somewhere suitable to pull air external to the engine compartment, depending on routing. The issue of heat soak is valid, yet not enough to warrant a huge concern at speed. The air is moving at a rate where it is difficult to rapidly heat by the ambient temperature of the engine. This can be rectified by heat shielding or thermal wrap, or some other insulation... But for the most part, the intake is installed as form over function.
 

DenaliHD66

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
597
kardain said:
The hp increase is also due to the reduced turbulence. Like with efans, the increase isn't an increase, but a reclamation of lost hp due to part design.

I like that phrase. I shall use it in the future.
 

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