Ratchet Straps

TheGambler

Original poster
Member
Sep 12, 2012
39
I bought a hitch rack from tractor supply and I am looking for a specific strap. I have some but I am looking for a 14' or 15' 1000lb working load limit, rubberized handle strap in 1" with and S hooks. I have small i bolts as anchor points on my rack and can't fit double J hooks of the bigger ones. I have had the Reese Titians with the v shaped release and didn't like them I have a set of these
Highland/Heavy duty ratchet tie down (94385) | Tie Down Strap | AutoZone.com

I love them, but I use them at work so I want to get a second set a pair of 2.

Any Suggestions.
 

Porkins

Member
Dec 5, 2011
6,960
Never seen "S" straps. I use 27ft 4" web "trucker straps" but I think that is a little over board for what you need. Maybe.
 

TheGambler

Original poster
Member
Sep 12, 2012
39

blazinlow89

Member
Jan 25, 2012
2,088
I bought mine for the cargo rack from an Ollies, basically a glorified Big Lots. They are bright orange, and have 1200# working load. Cost was 17.99 for 4, brand is safe strap. Worth every penny. And the hooks are perfect to wrap around the upper bars on the rack.

Correction SmartStrap
 

blazinlow89

Member
Jan 25, 2012
2,088
These are the ones I have.

SmartStraps 14' 3000 lbs. RatchetX, Orange 4 Pack: Automotive : Walmart.com

I have found some really good deals at the Ollie's stores.

I also keep some the cheaper tension style ones in the truck for anytime I do not need the full ratchet force. I gave 2 of those away before Christmas, poor guy dropped a tree off of his truck 2 times in front of me (he had it on the tonneau cover). It did not fall after that.

Which cargo rack did you get.
 

PennTB02

Member
Jan 26, 2012
24
TheGambler said:
anyone else try to fallow DOT regulations when it comes to strapping down?
:rotfl: :crackup:
We are talking about a cargo basket behind an SUV not thousands of pounds of steel or building materials on a semi trailer.
Here is how I decide if the load is secure: Is there something preventing the load from shifting to the left, right, front, and back? Is the web of the tie down straps NOT touching anything that could cut it even if you drove for 1,000 miles? Are all the free ends of the straps secured such that they cannot flap? If everything thing looks OK grab the load with both hands and shake it, twist it, push it, pull it, and bounce it. Only when it no longer moves are you ready to go.


P.S. I agree with you, get an additional set of straps to keep in your Envoy. You will appreciate them for that odd or unexpected load.
 

TheGambler

Original poster
Member
Sep 12, 2012
39
PennTB02 said:
:rotfl: :crackup:
We are talking about a cargo basket behind an SUV not thousands of pounds of steel or building materials on a semi trailer.
Here is how I decide if the load is secure: Is there something preventing the load from shifting to the left, right, front, and back? Is the web of the tie down straps NOT touching anything that could cut it even if you drove for 1,000 miles? Are all the free ends of the straps secured such that they cannot flap? If everything thing looks OK grab the load with both hands and shake it, twist it, push it, pull it, and bounce it. Only when it no longer moves are you ready to go.
DOT regulation state that there should be at least 2 straps on any load no matter how small the load is. They also state that your straps wll should equal 1 1/2 the weight of the object you are strapping down. If you are hauling a trailer you are to keep the heaviest weight just forward of the trailer axels and keep your straps straight with no twist. Stuff like that.
 

blazinlow89

Member
Jan 25, 2012
2,088
PennTB02 said:
:rotfl: :crackup:
We are talking about a cargo basket behind an SUV not thousands of pounds of steel or building materials on a semi trailer.
Here is how I decide if the load is secure: Is there something preventing the load from shifting to the left, right, front, and back? Is the web of the tie down straps NOT touching anything that could cut it even if you drove for 1,000 miles? Are all the free ends of the straps secured such that they cannot flap? If everything thing looks OK grab the load with both hands and shake it, twist it, push it, pull it, and bounce it. Only when it no longer moves are you ready to go.


P.S. I agree with you, get an additional set of straps to keep in your Envoy. You will appreciate them for that odd or unexpected load.

Good way to leave your load on the road for me to pick up. That's how I got my chain saw.
 
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PennTB02

Member
Jan 26, 2012
24
TheGambler said:
DOT regulation state that there should be at least 2 straps on any load no matter how small the load is. They also state that your straps wll should equal 1 1/2 the weight of the object you are strapping down. If you are hauling a trailer you are to keep the heaviest weight just forward of the trailer axels and keep your straps straight with no twist. Stuff like that.

My bad. You were being serious while I was not.

I agree two straps is the absolute minimum! Everytime I see a refrigerator in the back of a pick-up truck with just one strap that goes up, over, and down the other side I try not to imagine what could happen.
 

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