Need some garage door help

willn513

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
918
So a couple of weeks ago I noticed that our garage door was closing much louder than it usually does. Not during the actual operation of up and down, but when it's closing and almost reaches the bottom to be closed all the way, it almost like drops and slams shut.

I have been insanely busy lately and it has been working fine other than the 'slamming' issue (opens/closes) every time without trouble so I haven't really even looked at it to check it out.

Until tonight. Here's pics of what I found. Basically the header bracket is mounted on a small piece of wood that was just nailed in. So my question to you guys is this- should I just reattach the 2x6 where it was with lag screws or something, or is there a better (more permanent) solution to fix this? I am just concerned that if I reattach it, it will pull right back out again. What do the wonderful resourceful brains at gmtnation think??? Thanks!

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TollKeeper

Supporting Donor
Member
Dec 3, 2011
8,159
Brighton, CO
Looking at the spider webs, its been failing for awhile.

Lag bolts will work, but what is that backing made off?

Looks like drywall. If it is, you will need to use a stud finder, and run a 2x6 board across the beam, running bolts thru the 2x6 into each stud (at least 2 bolts to each stud), to create a proper supporting. Then bolt your garage door opener into the 2x6.

If its Concrete, you will have to buy a special drill bit, and special bolts meant for concrete, and run that brace back into the concrete.

Either way.. FUN! I just had to do a similar thing to my garage because the wife decided she didn't like the side of the garage being that close to her mirror. The mirror lost, but did damage the support, all the way in to the cross support.
 

DucatiSS

Member
Nov 19, 2011
369
Have a garage door guy come over and release the tension on those springs before you do anything. Do not try this yourself. They really pack a wallop.
 

willn513

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
918
Thanks for the replies guys. We haven't been in this house real long so I don't know what kind of service (if any) this thing has had. Also not sure of the age of things either. Looks like the nails do go straight into the drywall but I'm not sure what's behind there. The exterior if the garage is brick so I know that's back behind there somewhere.
 

christo829

Member
Dec 7, 2011
507
Fairfax, Virginia
Same thing happened to my aunt's garage door. I ran additional 2x6's on either side of the pulled board, lagged in to the framing,
up at the corner where the wall meets the ceiling. The pulled board was luckily also fastened to framing members, but only by nails.
I re-fastened it with lag bolts, and then ran a 2x4 "strap" across the top of the board, screwed to the original board and the 2x6's on
either side.

Hopefully you've got some framing in there to attach to, behind the drywall. You'd have to in order for the nails to have held it
for any period of time. If they were only tacked to drywall, that would have pulled out almost immediately with the stress from the
door.

The 2x4 I used on my aunts door is high enough to not get hit by the traveler arm of the garage door. Her door design has a portion
that looks like it goes closer to the wall than yours does as it closes.

It's not going anywhere....unless she decides to drive through it.

Good Luck!

Chris
 

The_Roadie

Lifetime VIP Donor
Member
Nov 19, 2011
9,957
Portland, OR
To tie two unrelated threads together, are you sure your house wasn't built by the Shed of Doom guy? :rotfl:
 

BRomanJr

Member
Dec 9, 2011
371
Garage Doors always have a header (double 2 x 10 or larger) over them, although some could be a "truss" design and not solid.

:iagree:
I second the comment about the spring tension being dangerous. don't attempt if you are inexperienced with them.
You MUST release the tension before working on.
The springs have more tension when door is down, but it would be impossible to work on with the door open.

Your call, be safe.
 

willn513

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
918
BRomanJr said:
Garage Doors always have a header (double 2 x 10 or larger) over them, although some could be a "truss" design and not solid.

:iagree:
I second the comment about the spring tension being dangerous. don't attempt if you are inexperienced with them.
You MUST release the tension before working on.
The springs have more tension when door is down, but it would be impossible to work on with the door open.

Your call, be safe.

I was nervous about doing this on my own with the family away for the day (read: nobody to call 911!) so I had a service tech come out and make it right. Props to Cincinnati Door and Window. Called them at 11am today and job was done by 1:30pm. Awesome service all the way around. He not only reattached and reinforced the header bracket, but also lubed and adjusted all components if the door and opener. Works the best it ever has!

On a side note if you guys are in the Cincinnati area these people are great!
 

willn513

Original poster
Member
Dec 4, 2011
918
the roadie said:
To tie two unrelated threads together, are you sure your house wasn't built by the Shed of Doom guy? :rotfl:

No no can't be built by the same guy. The shed is a high-quality, awe inspiring display of craftsmanship at its finest. Clearly the builder(s) of my house took a few shortcuts here and there, while this fine gentleman most certainly does not.
 

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