XUV eats batteries

emedlin

Well-Known Member
My 04 XUV with 204K on it has went through about a battery a year for the past 4 years. I thought it was just bad batteries / luck. Some were replaced under warranty. I got to find out warranties only seem to cover one replacement per purchase. Well I had to replace one yesterday, so now I am trying to figure out what is causing it. When they die I take it Advance, AutoZone, etc. and they have always tested bad, ie bad cell. I had them test the alternator and look for leaks about a year ago when I had to have one replaced and they couldn't find anything wrong.

This time we noticed some corrosion on the ground terminal. The tech said that corrosion on the terminal could kill a battery cell. Is that true? I haven't noticed corrosion on it before on the other batteries, but maybe I didn't look close enough. I also would have thought previous techs would have noticed it also. I do need to change it or clean it till it shines. The tech sprayed something on it and brushed it a little. But, I am sure it needs more cleaning.

Another thing that happened this time was when they tested the battery the headlight washer squirted the tech. They said it should not do that unless some wires were crossed. It didn't do that when I jumped it off earlier in the day, but when I tried to start it with the dead battery it squirt then. I could also hear it reset the radio / CD player.

Every time the battery has died it would not sound/act weak, but then be completely dead the next time you try to start it. I had it die one time when I drove it to Sonic's to get some food and then when I tried to start it, nothing. It wouldn't even try to start. Sometimes it wouldn't even have enough power to unlock the doors or roll down the windows.

Now that I have a new battery it is running really rough. I know in that past that the computer has to figure out that the engine isn't new and perfectly clean and adjust some things. Then it normally goes away after you drive it awhile. Although this time it is bad enough to flash the check engine light (misfire) when going up a hill. No codes though. I cleaned the throttle body about a year ago. And the AC Delco iridium plugs have less than 100k on them I know. So, given that and that it ran fine before the dead battery could the reset be causing it to run this rough?
 

Mounce

Well-Known Member
Running issues after a dead battery is usually where the computer reset and thinks the throttle body is clean when it's actually dirty. It's a learned value that will take quite a few drive cycles to relearn. Or you can clean the throttle body and it'll clear up right away.

I've got no input for the battery issues unless your alternator is over or under charging. Or maybe you're deep cycling them, discharging them pretty far repeatedly running the radio or accessories with it not running. No other reason to be consuming batteries.

Also, might be worth taking it to a shop next time, let's face it that the autozone and advance guys are usually not mechanics and don't always properly diagnose a vehicle with their limited tools and expertise.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
I can try and find time to pull and clean the throttle body this weekend. But, would the computer reset cause the flashing check engine light (misfire) also? I won't be driving it today. But, plan to tomorrow afternoon. Maybe it will clear up then.

I am not running anything without the engine running. Not even idling setting in a parking lot with the AC blasting while listening to the radio.

PepBoys is actually who ran the diagnostic the last time on the alternator and looked for any power leaks. They were close to Sonic's where it died at and replaced the battery. So, I had them run the tests. Not saying they are better. Just want to be honest with who looked at it.
 

gmcman

Well-Known Member
Mine had done this since it was new...not sure why but I remember reading about this in the past. I just stand to the side until it's done doing it's business...lol.
 

xavierny25

Well-Known Member
Anytime I disconnected my battery, my headlight washers sprayed....never knew why.
After the 3rd time I got used to it and learned how to duck and weave whenever I reconnect it.
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
This is one of those repetitive problems with "Dying Batteries" that deserves to be inspected from the "Other End": Looking for the presence of Green Corrosion around Copper Ground Wires, Copper-Brass Eyelet Connections and Copper Electrical Bonding Straps:

BADCOPPERBONDINGWIRE.jpg

If you visit this next Link... You can download and use these Ground Location Images to locate and inspect all of the Major Grounds on Your XUV:


What is often overlooked with "Dying Battery Problems" is the fact that if you can see ANY GREEN Patina or GREEN Tint around ANY of those connections... the Electrical Resistance in these locations is HUGE compared to what it should be for Clean Copper Wiring and Connectors. The attached images will illustrate that once anything made of Pure Copper Oxidizes... the CuO (Cupric Oxide) compound becomes a NON-CONDUCTOR (unless super-cold at -200 Degrees F ...then It Becomes a SUPER_CONDUCTOR) that will Seriously increase Electrical Resistance. As shown in The Basic Theory of Electricity Diagrams... As Resistance INCREASES... Voltage DECREASES.

COPPEROXIDIZEDPENNY.jpgCRYSTALLINECUPRICOXIDE.jpgCUPRICOXIDECOPPERCORROSION.jpgTHEORYOFELECTRICITY.jpgYBCOSUPERCONDUCTOR.jpg

The Cool Part about this problem though... is that it Does NOT require Doing Anything as extravagant and impossible as Cutting Back the Corroded Connector(s) and/or having to Solder in New Insulated Wires or Components.

You only require Common, Non-Destructive Household Chemicals to CLEAN UP THIS CORROSION in very short order:

(1) White Vinegar (Acetic Acid)
(2) Common Table Salt (Sodium Chloride)
(3) Baking Soda (Sodium Bi-Carbonate)
(3) Water (Hydrogen Di-Oxide)
(4) Glass Tubes and Small Glass Jars to hold the Chemical Solutions & Submerged Wires
(5) A Little Patience while these Chemicals work their Magic


The attached Video is The BEST Instructive piece of information on How to Do This in an Automotive Setting:

 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
That is a lot of grounds. Not sure I get to the interior once very easily. The ones under the hood don't look that bad. Except for the 4 on the side of the engine block. So, does the corrosion just cause the battery to not charge up at the normal speed due to the increased resistance and that is what kills the battery?

Not sure if it matter, but while the car was idling I got 14.6 volts on the battery terminals with a volt meter. If corrosion was causing connection problems would the volts be that high?
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
Do you want to know what is so cool about Electricity? At its most Basic and Fundamental Level... Its SIMPLE. Unfortunately... most people believe incorrectly that with anything that uses a Battery...and of course... this means A CHEMICALLY POWERED, DIRECT CURRENT ENERGY SOURCE... that the Electron Flow Runs FROM THE POSITIVE (+) POLE) TERMINAL TO THE NEGATIVE (-) POLE) TERMINAL. Nope.

Nothing could be further from The Truth:

If you look at this Animated GIF of the Energy (Electron Flow) of ANY Direct Current Wire (or Battery)... What MOVES in the Electrical System are the Electrons that get exchanged between one Atom of the Conductor to the next (Copper, Aluminum... ANY Conductor) on and on and on ...to the NEXT Atom in line Moving FROM the (-) Negatively Charged Pole TO the (+) Positively Charged Pole. However ...if you take close look the Protons making up the Wire (Neutrons have NO Charge) you will notice that the (+) Postive Charge is Transferred from One Nucleus to the Next BUT WITHOUT PROTONS MOVING ONE SMIDGEN!

ElectronAtomicFlow.gif


Meanwhile... the Freed Up Electrons are going Hell Bent For Leather from the (-) Negative Pole of the (-) Battery Terminal ...THROUGH The Wiring Harnesses... and Right BACK to the (+) Positive (Pole) Terminal of the Battery after traveling THROUGH the Entire Circuit and Generating Power to Do WORK.

So the FALLACY here is that ALL of the Power of DC Battery lies in the (*) RED TERMINAL or Positive Side of the Circuit. However... as you plainly see... WITHOUT GOOD GROUNDS ... YOU CANNOT HAVE A GOOD FLOW OF ELECTRONS FROM THE BODY AND CHASSIS AND ENGINE GROUNDS LEADING BACK TO AND TRAVELING THROUGH THE SENSORS, LIGHTS, MOTOR AND DEVICES OF YOUR XUV ... THEN RIGHT INTO THE RED "HOT" WIRES AND RETURNING TO THE BATTERY TO COMPLETE THE CIRCUIT. Ergo... GOOD GROUNDS ARE EQUALLY AS IMPORTANT AS "HOT" LEADS" ARE AT THEIR CONNECTIONS.

When it comes to showing HOW a Basic Electrical Circuit is Designed... Nothing is More Basic than THIS:

BASICBATTERYPOWEREDELECTRICIRCUIT.png


As far as your Measurement of 14.6 Volts GOES... (after installing a New Battery and a New Alternator) I would have to say that these are GOOD Signs. But Measuring The Voltage in this Manner isolates the Battery from the Vehicle... and eliminates the chance for you to Test OTHER GROUND Locations on the Vehicle. Attach your Digital Multi- Meter (+) Lead to the (+) Side of the Battery... But Connect your (-) Ground Lead at a Distant Ground Location...and Measure THAT Voltage.

Clean up all of the
Grounds you can access closest to the Engine, XUV Frame and the Power Control Center...Remember...if you can See GREEN on ANY GROUNDS... They will need your undivided attention for Corrosion Removal.

If you determine after having performed the Swap for a New battery and a New Alternator that your Battery continues going DEAD.... Please visit the Link below for a Tutorial on "The BEST Procedures For Performing A Parasitic Draw Test":

 
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budwich

Well-Known Member
That is a lot of grounds. Not sure I get to the interior once very easily. The ones under the hood don't look that bad. Except for the 4 on the side of the engine block. So, does the corrosion just cause the battery to not charge up at the normal speed due to the increased resistance and that is what kills the battery?

Not sure if it matter, but while the car was idling I got 14.6 volts on the battery terminals with a volt meter. If corrosion was causing connection problems would the volts be that high?
Potentially over time, your "poor" battery has been under charged for what ever reason but still been asked to perform. :smile:

The problem with looking at the situation thru a volt meter, is that it doesn't really give an indication of how much charge is going into the system. An ammeter would be more useful but most cars don't have one these days.

depending on the system used in your vehicle, there is a current monitor that helps the system do the right amount of charging. Its referred to as a SARVC (stand alone regulating voltage control). The system "pushes" the voltage output of the alternator to see some level of current that it is monitor via the SARVC system. Depending on your driving experience at the time, it is adjusted both for charging but also for provide power to needed parts of the system.

Usually the module for the system is "looped" onto one of the battery leads to "feel" for the current passing by it (it is basically an induction type sensor). So if you have poor connections which cause / restrict current flows, the system "thinks" it is not seeing the amount of current it expects from an alternator and "pushes" the alternator to put out more voltage (which is the only control the system has... it can't demand current directly).

IF you are watching your system voltage on a "long trip", in most cases, the system should begin relatively high (assuming you used your starter and the car has sat for a bit), the voltage should drop into the trip after while IF the battery is taking up charge and the rest of the systems aren't demanding a large amount of power. IF this doesn't happen, then your charge / power system has issues.

Further, bench testing of an alternator DOES NOT really prove much other than check some of the components (diodes and windings). However, the true test is to have the thing spinning at speed and measure its output current going into a load and comparing that to its ratings. Most places can not do this. Without doing this type of test, the one main component not tested by a "dry bench test" is the brush system which is one of the main wear parts.

In your case, potentially, you may have a number of things going against you. One: when you have a "no start" condition, did you check your battery level at the battery to ensure that indeed the battery is "dead" as opposed to possibly a poor connection? Two: now you are saying that the vehicle runs rough with a new battery, that would point to other issues not directly related to the battery itself but either subtending connections or else where. The "elsewhere" could be related to a reason why your battery is dying depending on what "elsewhere" is. For instance, you mention the "spray in the face". This likely points to a "stuck relay" (related to the timed accessory delay) or elsewhere. Note with car turned off and a door open, I don't believe that you can spray your windows or cause wipers to run... otherwise every one would be having their wipers run all night having accidently left them on when parked.

So I think you need to look further as opposed to "dead battery and poor connection" as the explanation.... it might be but there appears to be other issues that are taking your battery out.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
The 14.6 volts were measured by touching the battery terminal wire connectors with the old dead battery after I jumped it off. I measured at the same place 12 point something volt with the dead battery before I jumped it off. But, it failed the AutoZone's battery test with a dead cell. I jumped it off with a small battery jumper connected to the same location to get it to AutoZone for them to test the battery.

So, why do circuits need so many grounds?

As for the spray, it isn't the windshield washers, but the headlight washers. It got them in the waist area. Could be an issue, but two others here have said it has always happened to them.

The alternator has 204K on it. So, maybe it is going bad. Should I just swap it out? Or, test it some how?

I also finally got a misfire code after driving it around for about 30 minutes yesterday. Number 1 cylinder is doing it. Around 5k misfires during a 15 minute drive. Rest are fine. Still find it strange it started flashing the light right after the battery change. Also, I changed the number 1 plug out about 5K miles ago after it died at around 50K. These are AC Delco Iridium plugs. I will check it this weekend and see if the plug is dead or what. If it is I will probably open another thread about it eating plugs, and leave this for just battery issues.
 
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budwich

Well-Known Member
So, why do circuits need so many grounds?

cause it is expensive and also troublesome to run wires all the way back to the battery terminal. Further, the basic body / block act as one "big ground plane" so that's where the circuits can find their ground. As for number and location, its likely more for manufacturing (assembly line) when and where parts / components are put in place during the "run" as opposed to ease of service / maintenance.

what's a "dead cell"... did they explain / check that.... just saying "dead" does provide much.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
So, if a ground has a bad connection say near the back of the car. Now lets say the brake lights don't work because they don't get power due to them using the ground near the back of the car. That shouldn't cause any problems with the battery right? Just trying to figure out how bad grounds through out they car would cause issues with the battery. Seems like only grounds specifically used by the battery and charging system would cause an issue. If so I really only need to know which ones those are and check them.

They didn't explain what "dead cell" means. They just connect their battery tester device to the battery terminals and let it run its tests for a few minutes. I assume it is what says bad cell or an error code that means that.
 

xavierny25

Well-Known Member
All grounds lead back to the battery either via chassis or body panel.
I can't remember the name of the damn thing but it's on the negative side of the battery, strapped to all the wires leading back to the negative terminal. Well that thingammajig plays a big part in how much the alternator charges the battery.
Someone with better/full understanding of it should drop us some knowledge so we can further get what's going on.
 
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budwich

Well-Known Member
Yes in general, grounds for most of the circuits will not impact your battery health in terms of charging so you may focus more on those associated directly with the battery... BUT and there is always a "butt"... :smile: grounding is only part of the circuit, the powering portion is also important as resistance in the powering / charge leads may cause reduced current flow as the TOTAL resistance path from the ground to powering is involved.

In addition, continual "draws / drains" are hard on a battery. By this, I mean, a normal system has a "designed parasitic idle drain" (usually in mamps) that was engineered for the battery and system. IF that drain is outside "normal" especially higher than normal, then the battery is constantly being drawn down, asked to provide high power at certain times (starting, headlights, etc) and then is being "hammered" with a recharge cycle. Basically, if you look, a battery loses about half its power when the voltage level "at rest" is about 10.5-11 volts. So if your battery drains down to this point and then is asked to provide a large amount of power, its not going to be continually happy. Further when a drained battery is charging especially on cars, the system pushes significant current at it for long periods. This can cause plate issues in the cells which isn't good. This is unlike standalone battery charges which usually can be set to push small amounts of currents for a long while to prevent damaging the cells.

So your issue of "eating batteries" isn't necessary a battery or a charging problem... but could be. You need to follow some of the information posted previous to look for ROOT causes or otherwise just keep buying batteries. For instance, your "dead cell" symptom tells you little. Was the cell dry, was the acid done (ie. specific gravity), etc. Depending on what the real causes of the "dead cell" is, you might have a bad manufactured battery (poor luck, or otherwise), poor maintenance (batteries do need to be serviced... maintenance free is a marketing idea for most), or other causes. Since you had a few batteries, do you actually know anything about the other failures? Seems not.... so any "pattern" can't be followed beyond "eating batteries"... that's going to make your troubleshooting journey very difficult, time consuming and maybe monetarily costly (depending on who does what).
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
All the other batteries died basically the same. Car started fine then the next morning or leaving a store nothing. It wouldn't even try to start. Radio clock was reset back to 12.

Now if the cell was dry, acid done, etc. I don't know. But, 4 batteries with each lasting about a year sounds more than bad luck. The last two were Bosch batteries. I don't remember what I had before that.

Besides driving the car and not letting it sit for weeks what maintenance needs to be done? No of my other cars have ever had a problem like this.

Plan to test for something draining the battery this weekend along with checking on the misfire that has started after the battery swap.
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
@xavierny25 ... I'm not certain that this is what you're referring to ...but as illustrated in the 4th Gen Camaro Diagram... the "Fusible links" are all of the insulated wire HOT Leads that Exit some of the Major Wire Bundles in vehicles and then all get Bolted Down where they converge inside of a Red Insulated Cup with a Flip Cover to keep them from getting accidentally Shorted Out.

Likewise... any Grounding Wires that cannot be conveniently "Strapped" or "Earthed" to the Body, Frame or Engine Block.... exit the same Harness and are attached to One Single Grounding Bolt. This style of Matched (+) Positive and (-) Negative leads is also used in Fibre-Glas Body Corvettes....where having So Much Metal to cross-connect as being "Grounded to a Common Plane" as @budwich coined as an expression...is absent. It is important to Note that the Metal "Clamped Spot" Welding and mixed and matched methods of Grounding used in our vehicles produces High Resistance to Electron Flow:

FUSIBLELINK1.jpg
 
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xavierny25

Well-Known Member
Screenshot_20190711-145719_Samsung Internet.jpg
@MRRSM that's the doohickey I'm talking about in the horrible screenshot I got off the internet. I should of worded it as wrapped and not strapped, sorry for any confusion.
 
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budwich

Well-Known Member
All the other batteries died basically the same. Car started fine then the next morning or leaving a store nothing. It wouldn't even try to start. Radio clock was reset back to 12.

Now if the cell was dry, acid done, etc. I don't know. But, 4 batteries with each lasting about a year sounds more than bad luck. The last two were Bosch batteries. I don't remember what I had before that.

Besides driving the car and not letting it sit for weeks what maintenance needs to be done? No of my other cars have ever had a problem like this.

Plan to test for something draining the battery this weekend along with checking on the misfire that has started after the battery swap.
the problem is you are stating symptoms and not much more. Without the "much more", its going to be a "crap shoot".

One year is pretty bad so it is unlikely to be the 4 batteries but never say never in this day and age of manufacturing especially with recycling and "low cost manufacturers". Even 1 year old batteries can be overcharged readily by a system and result in "bad cells" which are dry or otherwise. Since, you have been having the experience often especially after the first one, it would have been wise to keep closer checks (once a month or otherwise) on the state of the battery. These would have included visual and gravity tests on cells, voltage checks after car sitting unstarted for more than 3 days, same test with throwing on lights to simulate load. Do these on a regular basis will form a base line so you can tell when things are going south before they go south to a no start condition / death condition.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
View attachment 89899
@MRRSM that's the doohickey I'm talking about in the horrible screenshot I got off the internet. I should of worded it as wrapped and not strapped, sorry for any confusion.
It's called the SARVC. If it's the issue, you can simply unplug it and the alternator will work like an older model alternator. However, the OP's truck is an 04 and pretty sure he doesn't have one.

For the radio to lose memory and the key staying locked, you are losing all power as if the battery is disconnected or battery has very low voltage. You need to check and clean all connections and grounds thoroughly. When it happens, disconnect the battery and check the voltage directly on the posts.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
Can't WAIT for the Weekend!

View attachment 89901
Glad to provide some excitement. Plan to start Saturday afternoon.

For the radio to lose memory and the key staying locked, you are losing all power as if the battery is disconnected or battery has very low voltage. You need to check and clean all connections and grounds thoroughly. When it happens, disconnect the battery and check the voltage directly on the posts.
The radio lost the time, but the key didn't stay locked. I think it has before in the past though. Plan to do some cleaning after I check on the misfire that started after the battery change. When the battery wouldn't start the car this time I did check the voltage, but the battery wasn't disconnected. I got 12 point something touching the bolts that hold the battery terminals on. Can't remember the exact reading now.
 

gmcman

Well-Known Member
How many volts is your alternator putting out at idle, and at 1500 RPM?

Double check your side terminals are making good contact with the battery, look at the tabs inside the side terminals.

Could be something like losing connection momentarily and ruining a coil.

I just recently unplugged my MAP sensor while the engine was running, took out my #1 coil. Strange things happen and loose connections can surely be the culprit.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
Fun you mention coil. My number one coil is dead. The plug looked OK, so moved the plug to number 2 and coil to number 3. Misfire moved to number 3. This is my second coil (not the same one) I have put on the truck in 204K. Although the other one died maybe around 100k ago. Going to get a new coil in a minute.

Cleaned the ground terminal at the battery with a wire brush. No Coke or baking soda. But, it is shiny now. I check the ground on hood and the ones on the left and right fenders. They looked fine.

Hope to look for power leaks on the fuses later tonight or maybe tomorrow depending on time. Just to be sure. I will check the volts at idle and 1500 rpm also. I assume testing on the battery terminals is a good place to test it.

The tabs on the terminals are not flat with the rest of the terminal, so I guess they are good.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
Could not find an AC Delco / Delphi so just got a Duralast. No misfires now. Not sure if the battery had anything to do with the plug going bad or what.

Voltage at the battery contacts are 14.05 idle and 14.15 at 1500 rpm. This is with a new battery. Will check for power leaks tomorrow. Ready to call it a night and time to eat.

Oh, I got some battery terminal cleaner while I was out and sprayed the ground and positive terminals also.
 

gmcman

Well-Known Member
Sounds good, wanted to be sure the alternator wasn't putting out too much voltage.

Check the glovebox light, if it's hot right when you open it that could be the culprit.

Do you have an aftermarket alarm?
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
No glove box light. And no after market alarm.

I tried to check if there was a draw by putting my meter inline with the ground terminal and battery terminal, but I could never get it to work. I even tried opening the door and turning on the lights, but I couldn't get a good enough connection because nothing would turn on.

I did go through and touch the tops of all the fuses looking for any voltage and only saw zero's. So, maybe I don't have a drain.
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
Have you Tested the Fuses in the Rear Fuse Box for "Parasitic Draw" ...Under the Driver's Side Left Rear Passenger Seat?
 
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MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
If everything is "Jake" right now... Drive the SUV for a while... Record the LONG Intervals Between the Times the Vehicle is Parked until the NEXT consecutive times for any Start Ups.

Just prior to Turning the Key... Take a Battery Voltage Measurement. An acceptable, normal "Drain Down"...should be somewhere around .25 mV Per Hour ...IIANM. If things remain within an Acceptable "Static Battery Voltage Level" in between these intervals ... then you should be Good To Go.

When it comes to anything Mechanical... If you Keep LOOKING for Trouble... You will most certainly FIND IT...
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
Just tested it again. I got 12.55 volts.

That is a 0.09 volt drop in 47 hours. Which is 0.0019 volts per hour. So I am dropping faster than .25mV per hour, but still not that fast.
 
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budwich

Well-Known Member
but did you do anything... even opening the door to open the hood is going to cause some drain to happen. I wouldn't consider a battery dropping to 12.55 in a day a "significant drain issue".
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
All I did was open the door to open the hood. Just drove it for about 15 minutes. Parked it for awhile and drove back. I am reading 12.87 volts now. I don't think I will move it again until late next week. I will check the voltage again then and see what I get.

Oh and it was two days not one. So, I will go and edit my post.
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
I guess that changes your "calculation"... :smile: again, I don't think that's your current issue (drain) at this point.
 
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emedlin

Well-Known Member
Just checked it again, and it is at 12.50 volts. It seems to be holding. I have not moved it or anything in 7 days. Just opened the door today to open the hood. Maybe it has been corrosion all alone and no one noticed it. Or, it just got bad enough to notice.
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
could be... the problem with most cars is monitoring voltage via the dash panel isn't very good as the meter isn't very good. Since you have had the problem "repeatedly", as suggested, you need to get in a routine (once a month or otherwise... what ever is convenient), take a check of the voltage to see what's up until you are confident that what ever was a cause of battery failure was potentially address. Do the measurement as "rest" (nothing happening in the vehicle, key off) then take a second measurement with the headlights on (ie. medium load). Track this for a while to "bench mark things"... then you will hopefully see if things are going south before they get to the "pole". :smile:
 

Maverick6587

Well-Known Member
No glove box light. And no after market alarm.

I tried to check if there was a draw by putting my meter inline with the ground terminal and battery terminal, but I could never get it to work. I even tried opening the door and turning on the lights, but I couldn't get a good enough connection because nothing would turn on.

I did go through and touch the tops of all the fuses looking for any voltage and only saw zero's. So, maybe I don't have a drain.
In my humble opinion, I would say either your alternator is bad or you have a parasitic draw. I would test both and see if you can narrow down the problem before swapping out parts.

I would also check and clean 7-8 of the grounds for the vehicle. 4 of them are highlighted in the attached picture. They are on the left side of the engine and fairly easy to get to from under the vehicle. 2 are on the driver's side, on the outside of the frame. One is near the driver's door and the other is near the rear driver's side door. There's one in the engine bay on the wheel well (driver's side). Easiest to get to that one with the wheel off. The last one is on the left (passenger's) side of the engine right in the middle, like the 4 that are on the driver's side.

There are another 3-5 grounds (not sure the exact number) all attached in the engine bay near the fuse box as well. I think there's two attached to the inside of the fender and 1-2 attached to the firewall. All 3-5 are very easy to get to and clean. After you clean all of your grounds and the battery connectors make sure you spray them with a good dielectric grease, don't use the thin spray-on type, make sure you use a thicker wipe-on type of grease.

All of those grounds are show stoppers. I had two of them that looked clean (so I didn't touch them). It took me two weeks to find out those two stopped my fuel pump from turning on and the other had something to do with the PCM, can't remember what it was though.

Here are two videos that show how to find a parasitic draw by battery amperage draw and how to test the alternator. ERICTHECARGUY is very detailed in his explanation of his processes of diagnosis. Before or after doing the below tests, I would also go check some of the main grounds for the Envoy.


 

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gmcman

Well-Known Member
When you open the door, I believe you wake up some of the modules. If you want to test your battery, leave your hood open.

Sometimes the modules won't go to sleep and could be a cause of your drain.

This is something I just remembered from years past on this site, either way, don't disturb the hood or doors when you check the battery as your hood has a light on it as well.

Have you checked and cleaned all your grounds?
 

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