Well That Escalated Quickly

Daniel644

Well-Known Member
#1
As some of you may remember I have been SLOWLY working on a MASSIVE, complete renovation of the lower level of the house Friday night I plumbed in the drain for the new Kitchens sink, well the under the sink portion, still gotta run it over to the sump pump and connect to the Vent stack, so to get it "rigged" up I ran a piece of pipe through the wall because the bathtub was on the other side of the wall and just had the sink draining into it, then I decided to remove a section of drywall that should NEVER have been installed (the bathroom was drywalled BEFORE the Tub was installed) and that left little support for the tub but gave me access to the drain to disconnect the tub, so I pulled the tub out, cleared out the remaining bits of drywall behind the tub, then got to looking at things and decided to pursue the idea of a larger tub (or maybe going full on shower) to that end I had to solve 1 MAJOR issue, the centerline of the toilet was 12-13 inches from the edge of the tub (WAY TO CLOSE, code minimum is like 15" and recommended at 18"), so I get to checking some dimensions in the room where my Fridge is and other things and I come up with that I can move the wall 10" giving me room for a FULL SIZE tub (not this 14" tall 60x30 piece of crap kiddie tub) and so OUT GOES THE WALL. no longer is this a kids bathroom (toilet will be replaced with a taller one when I do the Tile work and the pedestal sink will be replaced with a Vanity with a Vessel Sink.

Next weekend we build the new wall and get working on moving the plumbing to a new location to suit whichever option I go with.
 

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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#5
progress update, cutoff the P-trap from the old tub location, extended the line and created the new drain and vent pipe for the kitchen sink that is on the other side of the wall (up next to where the P trap is in the photos), feels like the sink isn't getting a very good vent in terms of water flow when the other side of the sink is plugged shut so will likely need to do one of those Air Admittance Valves under the sink to increase the venting, next step is to shutoff the water to the house for a few hours to cut out the old Shower/Tub Filler valve setup and connect those water supply lines to the Kitchen sink (will run new lines in the new location for the shower).
 
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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#6
I've decided to expand this thread to be a general log of the work i've done hoping this will keep me more motivated to keep making progress on everything. we are working on refinancing so i've stepped up and started a push, had my brother up over the weekend and we wrapped up the vital points of the electrical rework and I got several sheets of drywall up on the ceiling and went ahead and hung the chandelier in the living room.
 

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littleblazer

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#8
Looking good.
 
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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#9
talked to my brother in law (the one that I was able to use the jackhammer from his work) who talked to his boss, to plumb in the center drain shower properly I needed to remove some more concrete, so we had a whole already I was able to simply dig out under the slab and beat the shit out the slab with a sledge hammer and about 2-3 hours of digging and sledging later and the hole is now big enough to route the plumbing so the drain can go straight toward the yet to be built wall so a vent can be run u inside that wall to tie into the existing vent and then from there tie into the existing main drain line I uncovered.
 

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#10
Slab house huh? I honestly never want a slab house - at least for the main part where all the plumbing and such is - precisely for this reason. Way too much work for me!
 
#11
Plumbing a bath through concrete is oh so much fun! When I added one to my basement I used a concrete saw to cut the trenches. Lot of dust but I cant imagine using a jackhammer indoors.
 

Bow_Tied

Well-Known Member
#12
When I plan renovations I come up with a budget and schedule that seem reasonable. Then I doublet the budget arbitrarily without adding anything to the plan. Then I triple the time required for the schedule. That way I am only somewhat over budget and late on the schedule. :biggrin:
 
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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#13
Slab house huh? I honestly never want a slab house - at least for the main part where all the plumbing and such is - precisely for this reason. Way too much work for me!
Basement Reno into a full on "in-law suite" as they call it in real estate, where before it was a bedroom, a not to code bathroom (tub 12" from center of toilet) with kid sized fixtures and a large open room that I have partially divided into 2 making the living room and kitchen.

Plumbing a bath through concrete is oh so much fun! When I added one to my basement I used a concrete saw to cut the trenches. Lot of dust but I cant imagine using a jackhammer indoors.
far to much dust for a space being actively lived in using a concrete saw, plus they didn't have one and I didn't want to pay to rent one. the jackhammer was one of those Electric models which is a lot better for indoor use, made quick work of the initial hole, only took like a few hours to do that first hole.


When I plan renovations I come up with a budget and schedule that seem reasonable. Then I doublet the budget arbitrarily without adding anything to the plan. Then I triple the time required for the schedule. That way I am only somewhat over budget and late on the schedule. :biggrin:
timeline is SO out the window, i've accepted it will be done when it is done, my budget was insanely tight starting out and I expanded my scope plans a few times, initially I was just gonna tile around the tub instead of the crap tub surround but as I pulled back the layers and saw how improperly installed it was (drywall put on the walls before the tub was set in place) I decided to rip it out and once I did that I decided to go full tile shower so I will end up spending how ever much I end up spending, I haven't added up the number in a LONG time, I've got a excel spreadsheet to plug in numbers to for tracking costs so I keep all my receipts for stuff, I know I went a few hundred over on the Dishwasher/Stove budget but it was a really good deal on the ones I got so it was worth it, i've still got like ALL the tile and tile related stuff to buy and some more framing materials for the rest of the ceiling but ultimately whats going to blow the budget out the window is what kind of tile/stone I use on the wall the TV/Fireplace is on and at some point in the future the backsplash tile/stone I will eventually do when I have the money for nicer countertops then these FREE ones my sister left behind when we bought the house from her.
 

xavierny25

Well-Known Member
#15
I would of piped that a little differently. Seem like the the pitch in draining is toward the bottom of the second picture. So any rushing water through the main would be pushed toward the tub drain. I may be wrong just looks odd. Or if I'm correct I'd put a check valve for the tub drain just in case. Nice work other wise.:2thumbsup:
 
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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#16
I would of piped that a little differently. Seem like the the pitch in draining is toward the bottom of the second picture. So any rushing water through the main would be pushed toward the tub drain. I may be wrong just looks odd. Or if I'm correct I'd put a check valve for the tub drain just in case. Nice work other wise.:2thumbsup:

it's fine, the angles look odd from this angle but I assure you the pitch is good (the end of pipe right before the trap is probably the better part of an inch higher then the pipe at the Wye), if anything it has to much pitch as a test I ran the bathroom sink after getting the Wye installed at the side of the ejector pit (top left on the first photo) before attaching any other piping and no water came out the OPEN 2" hole, the basic piping layout idea (I made a few tweaks as I was able to get the wye closer to the tank then first thought possible) came from my Brother Inlaw after he talked to his boss (they are plumbers by trade with his boss having over 20 years experience) the layout was mainly determined by the need to have a vent pipe come up in the new wall i'm building that was in the path of water travel between the drain and the wye so when you flush the toilet it wouldn't suck the shower trap dry.

it's easy enough to check, I didn't glue the cap on the vent pipe so when I get home I can flush the toilet and look and see if any water comes back up to the vent pipe location.

Edit: @xavierny25 definitely no flow back, there is a small amount of shavings at the bottom of the fitting where the vent pipe is in the wall, I turned on the kitchen sink, the bathroom sink and flushed the toilet all while looking down the vent pipe and not a drop of water.
 
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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#17
I would of piped that a little differently. Seem like the the pitch in draining is toward the bottom of the second picture. So any rushing water through the main would be pushed toward the tub drain. I may be wrong just looks odd. Or if I'm correct I'd put a check valve for the tub drain just in case. Nice work other wise.:2thumbsup:
further testing before pouring concrete, I just dumped a couple gallons down the new drain and it took it as fast as I could dump it in, even with the cap on the vent. Also even leaving the cap on the vent didn't result in flushing the toilet sucking the trap dry, the water in the trap did bob up and down about an inch, not near enough to drain the trap.
 
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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#19
so I made the drive down to Floor & Decor to look for shower tile, but everything I liked for the shower was way to expensive, but I did pick out my floor tile for the kitchen and bathroom floors, bought it and loaded all 14 cases (30 Kilograms each, 926 pounds total) in the backseat and hauled it back up here with the ass end of the Trailblazer riding an inch or so low.

here are some pictures of it against the Carbonized Bambo floors that will be in the living room and the bambo against the existing carpet in the bedroom.
 

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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#20
some other progress i've made, i've decided to semi close in the ejector pit to help muffle some of the noise it makes so I built a second wall on the side of the shelves that where partially floating shelves before that the microwave and toaster oven sit on then once I had that in place I ran a header over the opening (still need to frame in the wall above the header) and built another 2x4 shelf over the fridge for even more storage.
 

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Daniel644

Daniel644

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#21
more progress, went down to Ikea last Sunday and made my final decision of the vanity cabinet, once I got it home and assembled I realized the upper drawer was a bit different then I expected so I had to rethink the plans for the plumbing which necessitated removing the drywall, pulling the toilet to get the drywall out and adding some blocking to the framing, I know it's not the best framing job, but I had to work around a lot of existing plumbing and crap and get blocking for the oddball spacing of the mounts for the Ikea unit, then I had to rework some of the plumbing because the drain coming out of the wall stuck out to far (coming from the wall the 1.5" pipe came out then had a threaded adapter on it instead of getting the threaded adapter that fit into the sanitary tee in the wall directly, I had to cut out the old T and put in a new one with the other fitting so it would fit as tight as possible, all said and done it's all in and the drawers close.

for now i'm using a shelf leftover from my kitchen cabinets for a countertop until I can get the countertop I want.
 

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