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The Ultimate List of Handy Parts and Tools to Keep with You (with pictures)

Discussion in 'Article Submissions' started by therealsethallen, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. therealsethallen

    therealsethallen Well-Known Member

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    I mentioned I'd be making this list in a previous post, there will be an accompanying YouTube video soon. As we know, the GMT360/370s all have a nice little cubby in the rear cargo area. So here's what lives in the back of my 9-7x;

    THE OFFICIAL "USEFUL STUFF YOU SHOULD CARRY WITH YOU" LIST

    Kobalt 3/8-inch drive socket set. Got this thing for $17 on sale at Lowes. Love it comes with a lifetime warranty and it's in a really nice compact case.

    Rear Storage.jpg

    Pink storage bag; assorted sockets and wrenches.

    Assorted Sockets .jpg

    Black storage bag; fuses, electrical tape, small knife, RTV silicone, two spark plugs, zip ties, Gorilla Glue, Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor, IAT Sensor, pliers and screwdrivers.


    Assorted Tools.jpg

    NOT SHOWN Blue storage bag. Contains two of each bulb for the exterior, and several 194s for the interior.

    Loose item: Ignition Coil. A very common failure in the 4.2 engine, can leave you stranded.

    Ignition Coil.jpg

    Glovebox items. SURPRISE, I actually keep gloves in here as well as a nice little light I picked up at Tractor Supply for just a couple bucks. Behind the light is a small pharmacy. Imodium, Gas-X, Advil, Stay-Awake, breath mints, and some deodorant.

    Glovebox.jpg

    Finally, the center console. A smaller flashlight that's quicker to the hand, phone charger, and a 2-meter band Kenwood that has yet to be wired.

    Console.jpg

    THINGS THAT ARE NOT PICTURED;

    600 peak amp Schumacher jump pack, stored in the rear cargo area, fire extinguisher mounted in the rear cargo area and a breaker bar under my rear seat, an ELM327 Bluetooth OBDII diagnostic tool, usually a quart of motor oil. In one of the two side compartments I keep a tow strap, bungee cords and the air compressor hose, the smaller compartment has a high visibility vest and a winter beanie.

    Now this is not to go against @MAY03LT and his similar YouTube video which we've most likely all seen, but to give an idea of how I keep my stuff in my truck and show where it's kept.


    Questions, Comments and Additions are of course welcome!
     
    Redbeard, MAY03LT and Capote like this.
  2. HARDTRAILZ

    HARDTRAILZ Moderator

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    I have a Pittsburgh socket set w 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 drive that is real similar in size and has been great. Sometimes a 3/8 is not enough.

    I keep a spare ignition switch as well. Pretty common failure and a cause of lots of odd symptoms.

    Couple good lengths of different gauge wire can come in real handy plus a test light.

    Plug kit and tire inflator is a great thing to have with you. Most dont have on-board air, but it sounds like yours does.

    Always keep a couple ratchet straps are often handy.

    I keep some of basically every fluid, oil, trans, diff, power steering, coolant.

    A spare plug or two would be good and maybe a coil pack.

    Candle and fire maker.

    Calorie bars are good to keep you alive in dire situations and take little room.
     
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  3. Sir ffeJ

    Sir ffeJ Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget the glass break tool. You never know when you might need it. As well as a knife in the centre console to cut your seatbelt off. A bad roll over could leave you stuck upside down.
     
  4. HARDTRAILZ

    HARDTRAILZ Moderator

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    My last rollover I walked out where the rear was :2thumbsup:
     
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  5. Capote

    Capote Gold Supporter

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    I need to add a spare coil pack, ignition switch, spark plugs and some extra wiring. I'm covered tool wise as I always keep my tool box handy in the back. I'm liking these lists, very useful items.
     
    therealsethallen likes this.
  6. SnowBlazer

    SnowBlazer Silver Supporter

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    I need to add replacement parts such as ignition switches and what not, aswell as a tow rope and a flashlight with a strobe function. Last night I was cruising with my Prelude buddy in Black Forrest, and we got the Prelude stuck. I found out the hard way that I need more recovery eqipment in my rig. Luckily a nice guy in an Armada pulled the Lude out.
     
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  7. stickypoop

    stickypoop Well-Known Member

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    I always carry a recovery strap and tactical shovel. I don't offroad, but a bad spot on a logging road or just a load of snow and you or someone else may need a little tug

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. dmanns67

    dmanns67 Well-Known Member

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    Did not see it mentioned, but I like to also keep a variety pack of fuses. A 12V tire inflator is definitely a must along with jumper cables. I also like to keep a can of Fix-A-Flat as well. My spare tire hoist has failed on me before when I really needed it and my only choice at the moment was a can of Fix-A-Flat. It got me the rest of my 400 mile trip until I could get to a tire shop to get the tire patched properly.

    You never know when you will need tow straps/ratchet straps. An emergency/survival kit just in case as well as a couple MREs and bottled water. I also keep my ball hitch in the cargo area so it is always with the truck in case I ever need it. Also have a few hand tools as well.

    First responders knife in the center console is a good idea as well. Mine has a point to shatter glass and also a built in razor blade for cutting seat belts. Also, another knife, a couple flashlights, phone charger, Tylenol, GPS, container of quarters, pen/paper, and an ELM327.

    Most of the items in my kit was put together based on items that I have needed at one point in time while on the road.
     
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  9. MAY03LT

    MAY03LT Well-Known Member

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    No worries there my friend, seeing someone else carrying a spare coil makes me go

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. MRRSM

    MRRSM Gold Supporter

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    A Broken Spark Plug... with the sharp super hard Porcelain end edges facing outward...then tied tightly to a length of Nylon String at the base electrode and 5/8" barrel and whirled in the air to high velocity and spun like "David Trying to Slay Goliath" and then allowed to lightly graze the outside or inside of safety glass windows ...will instantly slice the glass surface, creasing and shattering all LOF (Libby Owens Ford) Pre-Stressed Safety Glass...and it will do it ...silently! Once cut and creased, the entire surface of the glass loses its phosphoric surface tension and then shatters into tiny cubes that just drop like a glass curtain to the ground. Its the strangest thing you have ever seen! But do not experiment on any cars... There is no putting the cubes back together! This technique will allow you to gain access and rescue someone trapped in a burning vehicle faster than any other method!
     
  11. therealsethallen

    therealsethallen Well-Known Member

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    I did mention fuses. I always suggest people carry a utility knife. I did forget to mention a snow brush/ ice scraper for the folks that get snow. I'll have to add the Fix-a-Flat. I kept some in my Volvo but I never used it. Seatbelt cutters are useful, too. Folding tactical shovel is in my Amazon cart.

    I don't keep food with me, I'll just eat it.
     
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  12. Chickenhawk

    Chickenhawk Well-Known Member

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    In addition to the parts and tools that most of you carry, I also have THREE first aid kits with me. Two of them are in the side cubby (with a clearly marked sign above saying FIRST AID KIT HERE) and the third larger one is in a red bag containing a lot of my other safety gear.

    In the side cubby is a weekender boo-boo kit containing miscellaneous first aid. It is from Adventure Medical Kits, and called a Day Tripper. I top it up with a few extra sterile swipes and extra bandaids that I replace every few years.

    Also in the side cubby, is the one I use for the really big boo-boos. Due to the nature of my job and the fact that I may be in remote areas where help can be minutes if not hours away, my individual first aid kit (IFAK) contains ONLY the bare essentials to keep me alive after a gunshot wound. When training, it rides on the back of my belt because 100 yards to my truck just might be 100 yards too far.

    The third kit duplicates some of the items in my smaller personal-sized IFAK, and adds a few extras. It sits in a bag also containing stuff I may not use every day but can come in handy, such as a length of climbing rope and an auto-inflating lifejacket. (For some reason, I often seem to be working near water.)

    My two gunshot wound kits were assembled based on a LOT of research and talking to everyone from EMS techs, emergency room doctors and combat medics. It resulted in an article for a police magazine on gunshot wound kits, discussing what every officer should have on them to keep themselves alive for the first ten minutes after a gunshot wound.

    Here are the contents of my individual kit:
    • 1 pair tan nitrile gloves
    • CAT tourniquet
    • 4-inch Israeli compression bandage
    • Celox Rapid combat gauze
    • 1 pair Halo chest seals
    • EMS shears
    There is also room for a Sharpie for marking the time of application on the tourniquet and surgical tape. A universal first aid patch on the outside of the kit and a few inches of orange paracord to the zipper pulls to help distinguish the first aid kit in a hurry. The IFAK contains nothing that I am not qualified or trained on, and one thing I learned early on is that the more experience a person has in combat medicine, the less junk they recommended for a kit.

    First Aid - IFAK photo 1.jpg

    I spend a lot of time on shooting ranges, so in my second larger kit in my vehicle are the items that are important but not necessarily critical for those first few minutes:
    • 6 more pairs tan-colored nitrile gloves
    • a second CAT tourniquet
    • 4-inch OLAES modular bandage
    • 4-inch Israeli compression bandage
    • 6-inch Israeli compression bandage
    • Quick-Clot Combat Gauze
    • 2 packs H&H compressed sterile gauze
    • EMS shears
    • CPR mask
    • 12 4x4 gauze pads
    • 2 Purell cleansing and sanitizing towels
    • 2 packs Water-Jel burn dressing
    • All Weather space blanket
    • Head-mounted LED light
    • Reflective traffic vest
    I am not a doctor nor a medic, but I did do a lot of careful research into IFAKs. I would be glad to answer any questions about first aid kits for shooters and police officers.

    I also have a rescue knife in the driver's door, a few flashlights here and there, chargers for anything and everything, a small 12v to 120v inverter, tools in the cargo well, a breaker bar under the rear seat and a few special items in secure slide-out cases that I am not at liberty to discuss.

    In all the years I have been training, the most I ever needed was a few bandaids. I would like to keep it that way. :smile:
     
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  13. therealsethallen

    therealsethallen Well-Known Member

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    I keep a fully stocked EMS trauma bag with me. Contains pretty much all of the stuff that would come in handy on any MVA (motor vehicle accident) scene, I did have to add a pocket CPR mask, a BVM, and a few more tunicates. It's orange, with a star of life. Pretty hard to miss.
     
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  14. stickypoop

    stickypoop Well-Known Member

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    Another great thing to carry...

    [​IMG]

    Can stop, or at least slow down, an active leak until you can get to where you need for a proper repair. I honestly didn't believe in the stuff until I used it on a transmission fitting (despite it's heat tolerance being much lower) and it worked so well I never did end up doing a proper repair.

    Combined with duct tape and other simple carry items, it may be just enough to get you off the dangerous side of the road
     
  15. SnowBlazer

    SnowBlazer Silver Supporter

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    I've herd of the off road guys going as far as carrying Sam Splints, C-collars and what not. I am a trained and certified First Responder but do get a little leery stopping in the middle of the road in the event of an MVA. Usually when I check on a MVA, I pull off and walk in. I don't carry a trauma bag and don't think I will as I'm always in the city with 20+ fire stations. Bit it's not a bad idea for y'all in real areas. :2thumbsup:
     
  16. therealsethallen

    therealsethallen Well-Known Member

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    Last winter there was a pretty bad MVA in a small town north of me. There was one officer on scene and EMS/Fire hadn't arrived yet. I've never seen a cop so happy to have a civilian on scene with him. I was an EMS student at the time, but it was 1:35am and the FD was going to be awhile. I ditched my Volvo helping, and it pulled itself out.
     
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  17. Capote

    Capote Gold Supporter

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    @Chickenhawk having an IFAK in the rig is a real good idea, I am very familiar with it being in the military and would like to get my hands on an extra to keep in the rig as well
     
  18. Chickenhawk

    Chickenhawk Well-Known Member

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    Thanks my friend. You will note a few things missing from my IFAK, compared to the military ones. No chest needles and no airways. The reason is simple: both of these are not critical for the first ten minutes and both require training and regular practice. Even trauma surgeons have trouble with them. Unlike you in combat where you are surrounded by trained soldiers, I look around a typical shooting range and see how many people I would want to have sticking sharp needles close to my heart. Pretty much none.

    For those of you who are shooters and not familiar with IFAKs, the whole purpose of the kit is to use on yourself or for someone else to use on you. That's why an IFAK must be close and easily identifiable. My larger kit is for me to use on others.

    Speaking of first aid kits, if anyone has any hemostatic blood clotting powder such as the Quik Clot, I would get rid of it. Trauma surgeons HATE that stuff. Some versions created exothermic reactions that could lead to serious burns, and the stuff is difficult to debride from wounds. This is why the military removed all hemostatic powders and crystals and replaced them all with hemostatic dressings. Celox Rapid Gauze is made with finely ground sea shells and Quik Clot Combat Gauze uses clay as the blood clotting agent; both are highly regarded in combat medicine circles.

    The other reason to dump hemostatic powders was because people would use it inappropriately. Instead of using it to stop bleeding that could not be stopped any other way, they would just sprinkle it on things like a fish hook in their thumb. Pressure is always the first resort to stop bleeding. This is why the pressure bandages like the OLEAS (named after U.S. Special Forces combat medic Army Staff Sgt. Tony Olaes who was killed September 20, 2004 during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan) and the Israeli bandage (commonly referred to as an "izzy") are probably the most likely to be used in a kit. Hemostatic gauze can be packed deep into a bullet wound. Tan gloves show the presence of blood much better than black gloves when doing an inspection. Tourniquets are very useful in event of major damage to limbs if pressure cannot stop bleeding, and chest seals are critical in event of a bullet wound that pierces the chest cavity.

    Due to the nature of my job, my kit is designed for gunshot wounds, not MVA. I am not a medic and in event of a MVA, I would not be able to do much more than just call 911, keep the person warm, protect the scene and stand around in a circle while waiting for EMS just like everyone else.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2015
  19. paulcmartin

    paulcmartin Well-Known Member

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    I'm in the process of writing a blog post on this subject but I need to take pictures. I have a tool box with just about everything I would ever need & a I keep a bluetooth OBD2 in the truck at all times for on the go diagnostics.
     
  20. dmanns67

    dmanns67 Well-Known Member

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    Forgot about my IFAK, but I usually keep that in my shooting range bag just in case and along with a tourniquet. Would not be a bad idea to keep it in the back of the TB. Does your IFAK have any Quick Clot? That's some nasty stuff.
     
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  21. BlazingTrails

    BlazingTrails Banned

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    The only thing I keep in my truck (in the cubby) is a small socket set, 10mm, 13mm, 15mm, 18mm wrenches, Jumper cables, tool bag with a small air compressor, plug kit, extra valve stems, pliers, etc. I do not have a spare wheel to save weight. Yeah some think it's crazy, but a lot of cars do not come with spare wheels (corvettes, high end cars, ex)

    Also if I go on a trip or pull the camper I take an extra coil with me, and usually throw my spare wheels in the trailer just in case. and also in the cubby on the right side of the truck, a quart of oil stand in there perfectly, so that is there too.

    But you see nothing in my truck at all besides the sub and my geocaching backpack and trekking stick. :yes:
     
  22. Sir ffeJ

    Sir ffeJ Well-Known Member

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    You know, with the recent mild quake (4.3-4.8) we had here in Vancouver, it gets me thinking that I really need to update my emergency provisions. I'm liking the idea of adding extra supplies for that "you never know" situation.
    Anybody on here have earthquake preparedness training?
     
  23. Chickenhawk

    Chickenhawk Well-Known Member

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    I hate Quik Clot and trauma surgeons hate Quik Clot. Personally, I would get rid of it, for the reasons I cited above. The Quik Clot Combat Gauze is way better. The military and pretty much all trained combat medics have pulled Quik Clot from their kits.

    Pressure will always be the first line of defense. But for combat and for police officers in an active shooter zone, they may not have the time to spend ten minutes on their knees applying pressure. Step number one will be to win the firefight, then patch up the holes.

    For IFAKs, the thing to remember is that you may not be able to self-administer pressure that long either. This is why a combat-style IFAK, with certain modifications as I detailed above, can also work for a self-administer kit when shooting by yourself.

    On the other hand, I will go through the rest of my career without ever opening a single izzy or unwrapping a tourniquet but that doesn't stop me from preparing for the virtually impossible. As an instructor, I need to plan for the one-in-a-million, even though I am a zero-in-a-million kinda guy. (That's also why my SBA has a double panel in the back.)
     
  24. Capote

    Capote Gold Supporter

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    I don't believe any of the OCP versions of the IFAKS we got have quick clot, and I know our medics don't like it either.
     
  25. MRRSM

    MRRSM Gold Supporter

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    This device is made and marketed by “Sahara-Sailor” and consists of a webbed band that is made of an extractable 3.2 Meter Long Parachute Cord… A very well designed and functioning Liquid Compass… An Emergency Whistle… A Serrated Stainless Steel Cutter… and a Flint Rod suitable and durable enough for Starting Fires. Since this item is so very light, you could easily forget that you are wearing it… that is until the need arises to figure out where you are and which way to go to get back to safety before the Sun settles out of sight over the western horizon.

    My wife picked up these as a pair for only $6.99 on Amazon Prime and it seems like just the item to add as Gifts for All Occasions. With a little bit of Training and Instruction needed, the whole family can get to know and understand the importance of such devices for traveling from anywhere… to anywhere… and safely back on the surface of the Earth. This Cool Item can be an addition to any good family discussion to have about the problems getting lost can present and knowing that how to “Work The Problem” can be a Life saver.

    https://www.amazon.com/Sahara-Sailo...&qid=1488211091&sr=8-3&keywords=sahara+sailor
     
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  26. HARDTRAILZ

    HARDTRAILZ Moderator

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    They are 8.99 for a pair, but you can get a third one and the Grenade one free with them by using a code.

    I just ordered to see how they are and for $9 I got 3 bracelets and the grenade thing. Figured it was a good deal esp when no rush shipping got me $5 back to us with Prime Pantry.
     
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  27. MRRSM

    MRRSM Gold Supporter

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    This is not a ‘Tool’… per se… But this is “One of Those Numbers… That Can Save Your Life...” Or perhaps that of another ...if it is added to your own and your Family Members’ lists of Cell-Phone Emergency Speed Dialers:

    If you suspect an overdose of ANYTHING, you should Contact a Poison-Control Center or a Local Hospital Emergency Room... Immediately…”

    You can Contact a Poison-Control Center at (800) 222-1222.

    Sometimes... A Mere Scrap of The Right Information can be as Vital to Survival as a Multi-Purpose Tool, A Box of Safety Matches or a Full Canteen of Fresh Water...
     
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  28. HARDTRAILZ

    HARDTRAILZ Moderator

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    Was really disappointed in these. The size is too small to actually be worn due to the size of the snap making them fit tighter than what a 9 inch should. I guess they are ok to toss in the glovebox or a bag, but they don't function as intended for me and my wrists are not real big.
     
  29. Redbeard

    Redbeard Well-Known Member

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    let's not forget the 4 way lug wrench
     
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  30. MRRSM

    MRRSM Gold Supporter

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    Here are some quite nifty “Top Five Survival Tools” (#3 Edition..) that might fit the bill for best use depending upon whether the situations are Urban ...or Deep in The Woods… with and without wheels under you and the family:

     
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  31. JPutnam

    JPutnam Well-Known Member

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    Wait, no serpentine belt? That is one of the first things I loaded in my vehicle besides the spare coil and tool box.
     
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