Power to a swiched fuse with key off

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Hello, how is everyone? Hopefully great. My name is Ed and I have a 06 Chevy Trailblazer 4.2 short wheelbase. I'm having a few issues but am sorting them out. Any help and time will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
What I working on now is my last engine code was a p0443. I wasn't getting any voltage to the purge solenoid but I had power at the fuse. So I tried a foot up from the plug, nothing.
So I ran a new wire from fuse 26 to the purge solenoid on the drivers side of the engine block.
I now have battery voltage at the purge solenoid and my code is gone. And stayed off after an hour of driving. The problem I'm having is now fuse 26 and the purge connector have power even with the key off. Which is draining my battery if the truck sits for any amount of time. I followed the factory wire and replaced it as it came from the factory.
Any help and time I will sincerely be thankful for.

Ed
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Welcome to the forum.

Best course would be to get the manuals (link in my signature) and check the schematics. Best bet would be to find the break in the original wiring. I don't know how that system actually powers itself but if the fuse stays on all the time, then it has to be switched down the line. Either try to fix the original break or find the switch point, see if the break is before of after it and fix what needs fixing.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Thank you very much. The wire from the fuse to the solenoid is new. The the problem has to be from the fuse to the key correct?
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Also if there was some sort of break wouldn't I get a code like the p0443 I had before I replaced the wire?
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Like I said, I don't know how that circuit is switched. The schematics should tell you this.

What I'm.saying is you bypassed the break and possibly the switch with that new wire
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Like I said, I don't know how that circuit is switched. The schematics should tell you this.

What I'm.saying is you bypassed the break and possibly the switch with that new wire
First thank you for your time. I'm sorry but I'm confused.
How would I bypass the break or the switch when I replaced the wire as it came from the factory and as it is on the wire diagram?
I opened up the harness from the solenoid all the way to the fuse box. Then instead of fixing the break at a crease in the harness with a splice I replaced the whole wire exactly the way it was from the factory.
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
I think all that mooseman is saying is that IF the original circuit is "switched" and was working correctly (ie. power is switched on and off at the right time, ie key off, key on, etc) and all you did was replace the wire, then the problem with the power always on is somewhere at the "control" of the "power on, power off" and that you need to look at the circuit diagram as suggested to find out what control point / circuit is responsible for the function (on/off) and understand why it is not happening..... he doesn't know / hasn't looked at that. Further, you might want to check your wiring change again just in case, it is bridging some contact in the fuse box unexpectedly as that is also a likelihood for "constant power".

Still further, disconnect your wire "change" at the fuse box and check the resulting fuse point again... IF it doesn't have the "ON/OFF" condition happening, then your wiring has nothing to do with the problem and as suggested look at the control circuitry.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
I think all that mooseman is saying is that IF the original circuit is "switched" and was working correctly (ie. power is switched on and off at the right time, ie key off, key on, etc) and all you did was replace the wire, then the problem with the power always on is somewhere at the "control" of the "power on, power off" and that you need to look at the circuit diagram as suggested to find out what control point / circuit is responsible for the function (on/off) and understand why it is not happening..... he doesn't know / hasn't looked at that. Further, you might want to check your wiring change again just in case, it is bridging some contact in the fuse box unexpectedly as that is also a likelihood for "constant power".

Still further, disconnect your wire "change" at the fuse box and check the resulting fuse point again... IF it doesn't have the "ON/OFF" condition happening, then your wiring has nothing to do with the problem and as suggested look at the control circuitry.
Thank you greatly for your time and willingness to help me.
I did exactly what you instructed, and with the new wire completely removed I still have battery voltage at the fuse. The wiring diagram shows that the switch is switched on and off from the ignition. I bought a new ignition switch and nothing. Same constant battery voltage at fuse whether key on or off.
Any help or ideas will be appreciated.

Thank you

Ed
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
:-( I don't have good access / computing power to look at much beyond forum posts. It would appear that your fuse box has some issues. Having said that I would be surprised that you have traced the problem correctly. I suspect that the fuse only provides powering to a relay or otherwise and hence, it will always have power with key on. You need to follow the control path of the grounds which are usually switched to activate some function when required.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Finally back home and have access to the manuals.

You are correct, there is no switch or other control between fuse 26 and both evap solenoids. The fuse is supposed to be switched and hot only in RUN and START positions.

Are there other fuses that are staying powered with the key OFF? Like @BrianF said, there could be an issue in your fuse box so unbolting it and tracing the wiring would be required.

Without full details, we had no idea you actually took the harness apart and replaced that wire exactly as it was. Now we have other leads to look at. 🙂
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
:-( I don't have good access / computing power to look at much beyond forum posts. It would appear that your fuse box has some issues. Having said that I would be surprised that you have traced the problem correctly. I suspect that the fuse only provides powering to a relay or otherwise and hence, it will always have power with key on. You need to follow the control path of the grounds which are usually switched to activate some function when required.
Sorry I forgot to mention the fuse box is new. If I switch back and for from the original to the new one I get the same thing. Definitely a expensive shot from the parts cannon.
I was told to pull the fuse and see if I have 12 volts at the valve. But when i pulled the fuse the volts instantly went to 0.
Ignition switch is new also.
Thanks again so much. This is definitely frustrating and probably shouldn't be this difficult.

Ed
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Sorry I forgot to mention the fuse box is new. If I switch back and for from the original to the new one I get the same thing.
More info the better. Please don't hold back :biggrin:

Electrical issues are the bane of enthusiast's existence. All I can offer is that something is up between the fuse box and ignition switch. Are there other circuits that stay powered on? There are others that are also powered by that same circuit (ign, PCM, etc.)
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
the valve is basically a solenoid. It needs 12v and a ground to operate. In a lot of auto stuff especially GM, 12v is always there is "hot at all times" or "hot with key on". Control of the valve is done by providing a ground probably from the PCM. So just having 12v to the valve isn't a problem... its whether the ground is always there which will cause a drain.

Basically, at your "new wire", disconnect it from the fuse box and with a meter measure the resistance on that wire to a known ground (eg. battery negative or body). It should read very high. If not, you have found your drain problem.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Finally back home and have access to the manuals.

You are correct, there is no switch or other control between fuse 26 and both evap solenoids. The fuse is supposed to be switched and hot only in RUN and START positions.

Are there other fuses that are staying powered with the key OFF? Like @BrianF said, there could be an issue in your fuse box so unbolting it and tracing the wiring would be required.

Without full details, we had no idea you actually took the harness apart and replaced that wire exactly as it was. Now we have other leads to look at. 🙂
Thank you for your time. Sorry I'm not being rude again but I explained in my first post that I took the harness apart and replaced the wire exactly the way it came from the factory.
No there are no other fuses doing what fuse 26 is doing. This fuse box is brand new. And so is the ignition switch. I've changed both of them back and for and they are both doing the same thing.
I was told to pull the fuse and see what happens, as in do I still have 12 volts at the valve. I did that and as soon as I pull the fuse the reading instantly goes to 0.
I'm not to sure what to do next so any ideas will be greatly appreciated. And I'm going to keep researching as I have to get this fixed without taking it anywhere. I've already wasted alot of money on the fuse box and ignition and solenoid for absolutely no reason.
Thank you again. I definitely appreciate people's time and help. It's definitely becoming extinct these days.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
I was told to pull the fuse and see what happens, as in do I still have 12 volts at the valve. I did that and as soon as I pull the fuse the reading instantly goes to 0.
OK, after pulling the fuse, is there still power at one of the fuse connectors? If so, which one? Off hand, I don't know which one is feed and the other is to the solenoid. Both should read 0v. If power is coming from the solenoid side of the fuse, then that would explain where it's coming from but not why. If it's on the feed side, well, time to do some tracing of that circuit, probably all the way to the ignition switch.
 

Maverick6587

Well-Known Member
It looks like the Evap Purge Solenoid should be carrying the power for the fuse, from the screenshot. I would unplug the fuse and test each wire shown connected to the Evap Vent Sol and the Evap Purge Sol. Compare which are hot while the fuse is connected and which ones are not hot while the fuse is removed.

I do not see any 5 v reference wires attached to this circuit, but I would always verify that there is still a 5 v reference going to the computer when troubleshooting. The Evap Purge Sol is going to pin 37 on the PCM.
 

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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
OK, after pulling the fuse, is there still power at one of the fuse connectors? If so, which one? Off hand, I don't know which one is feed and the other is to the solenoid. Both should read 0v. If power is coming from the solenoid side of the fuse, then that would explain where it's coming from but not why. If it's on the feed side, well, time to do some tracing of that circuit, probably all the way to the ignition switch.
Yes after pulling fuse 26 I have 12 volts at the connector closer to the driver's side fender. The other side read 0.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
It looks like the Evap Purge Solenoid should be carrying the power for the fuse, from the screenshot. I would unplug the fuse and test each wire shown connected to the Evap Vent Sol and the Evap Purge Sol. Compare which are hot while the fuse is connected and which ones are not hot while the fuse is removed.

I do not see any 5 v reference wires attached to this circuit, but I would always verify that there is still a 5 v reference going to the computer when troubleshooting. The Evap Purge Sol is going to pin 37 on the PCM.
Both wire at the vent valve and purge solenoid are hot with the fuse connected.
There are not hot wires when the fuse is removed.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
It looks like the Evap Purge Solenoid should be carrying the power for the fuse, from the screenshot. I would unplug the fuse and test each wire shown connected to the Evap Vent Sol and the Evap Purge Sol. Compare which are hot while the fuse is connected and which ones are not hot while the fuse is removed.

I do not see any 5 v reference wires attached to this circuit, but I would always verify that there is still a 5 v reference going to the computer when troubleshooting. The Evap Purge Sol is going to pin 37 on the PCM.
Pin 37 on the pcm also has 12 volts.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
I know you said you replaced the ignition switch but, what happens if you pull it out? It's practically impossible to have power at the fuse. If the power is gone, then I would suspect the switch. What brand was it? Usually anything but ACDelco is bad news.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
I know you said you replaced the ignition switch but, what happens if you pull it out? It's practically impossible to have power at the fuse. If the power is gone, then I would suspect the switch. What brand was it? Usually anything but ACDelco is bad news.
The switch is ACDELCO. When I remove the switch I still have 12 volts at the fuse.
There are 3 terminals at the top of the plug. And there are 4 terminals at the bottom. With the ignition switch removed I have 12 volts at the 2 terminal on the top. It's a red wire with a white stripe.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Well, I would highly suspect a shorted wire.

Check each wire at the connector for the switch. The RED and RED/WHITE wires are from battery power and should have 12v+. All others should be 0 as they are fed by the switch. Of particular interest is the PINK wire, which feeds fuse 26.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Well, I would highly suspect a shorted wire.

Check each wire at the connector for the switch. The RED and RED/WHITE wires are from battery power and should have 12v+. All others should be 0 as they are fed by the switch. Of particular interest is the PINK wire, which feeds fuse 26.
The only wire that is hot is the red wire with white stripe. All the rest are dead including the solid red wire.
I followed the wires down to a box that is screwed in with a 7mm bolt. I unscrewed the box and separated it. The only flat pin that is hot was the pin that the red wire with white stripe goes to.
It is now in the 20s and the truck is outside so I called it quits for the night.
The pink wire has no power.
If I think right the only wires let are the ones from the box on top of the brake pedal to the fuse box?

Would the wires that go to the vent valve by the gas tank cause this issue?
I'm getting 12 volts at both wires that connect to the vent valve just like I have 12 volts going to both wires at the purge solenoid.

Thanks again for all the help!!!!!!!
There can't be much let!
 

Mooseman

Moderator
I don't don't know if it's backfeeding from one of the solenoids since we don't know if that's the case at one of the fuse connectors. With the fuse pulled and the ignition switch ON, is there power at both connectors? And with the switch OFF, one of them go out?

Another test you could do to eliminate the PCM is to disconnect it and leave the ignition switch OFF. Is there power at the fuse and/or solenoids? It's the PCM that sends the ground signal to activate the solenoids. If it's shorted or defective, maybe it's sending 12v+ instead.
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
something is "fishy" with things.... the "observation" that "no other fuse exhibits the same condition" doesn't ring right. First, IF in the posted diagram (assuming it is from the right year), there is voltage at the fuse when the key is NOT in "hot at run" position, then the "hot in run" would be multipled to many other points in the box and other things. That is assuming that the diagram is indeed correct and that point is indeed a "hot in run". The "fact" that you pulled the switch and still had voltage at the fuse and "only at that fuse" (ie. no other hot at run fuses) indicates the fuse is likely not a "hot at run" fuse.

Having said this, if no other "hot in run" fuses show voltage with the key in off, then it is quite likely that fuse 26 is at hot at all times.... which is no big deal since the actual operation of the solenoid is controlled by a ground and not just having voltage. Hence, as suggested earlier but never answered, you need to do a resistance measurement of the wiring towards the solenoid to determine whether there high resistance there. This will determine if that circuit(s) is correct.
 
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Maverick6587

Well-Known Member
Having said this, if no other "hot in run" fuses show voltage with the key in off, then it is quite likely that fuse 26 is at hot at all times.... which is no big deal since the actual operation of the solenoid is controlled by a ground and not just having voltage. Hence, as suggested earlier but never answered, you need to do a resistance measurement of the wiring towards the solenoid to determine whether there high resistance there. This will determine if that circuit(s) is correct.
I did verify that the the diagram I posted was from the 06 Rainier.

@Blueking25 Earlier you stated that fuse 26 was only hot (12volts) on the driver's side fender side of the fuse box. Was that when the key is turned on or with the key in the off position? Do you only have 12 volts on the one side either way?
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
I don't don't know if it's backfeeding from one of the solenoids since we don't know if that's the case at one of the fuse connectors. With the fuse pulled and the ignition switch ON, is there power at both connectors? And with the switch OFF, one of them go out?

Another test you could do to eliminate the PCM is to disconnect it and leave the ignition switch OFF. Is there power at the fuse and/or solenoids? It's the PCM that sends the ground signal to activate the solenoids. If it's shorted or defective, maybe it's sending 12v+ instead.
With the fuse pulled and the ignition on there is only power to the connector closest to the driver's fender.
And with the switch off same thing.


Even with the pcm completely removed from the truck there is power at the fuse and solenoid.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
something is "fishy" with things.... the "observation" that "no other fuse exhibits the same condition" doesn't ring right. First, IF in the posted diagram (assuming it is from the right year), there is voltage at the fuse when the key is NOT in "hot at run" position, then the "hot in run" would be multipled to many other points in the box and other things. That is assuming that the diagram is indeed correct and that point is indeed a "hot in run". The "fact" that you pulled the switch and still had voltage at the fuse and "only at that fuse" (ie. no other hot at run fuses) indicates the fuse is likely not a "hot at run" fuse.

Having said this, if no other "hot in run" fuses show voltage with the key in off, then it is quite likely that fuse 26 is at hot at all times.... which is no big deal since the actual operation of the solenoid is controlled by a ground and not just having voltage. Hence, as suggested earlier but never answered, you need to do a resistance measurement of the wiring towards the solenoid to determine whether there high resistance there. This will determine if that circuit(s) is correct.
Fuse 26 is definitely a switched fuse(hot in run). That has been verified by a wiring diagram plus with another truck same year, make and model.
Plus if I leave the fuse in and plugged to the solenoid it drains my battery overnight.

The resistance test to the solenoid from the fuse box is 0.03
The resistance from the pcm to the solenoid is 0.03
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
I did verify that the the diagram I posted was from the 06 Rainier.

@Blueking25 Earlier you stated that fuse 26 was only hot (12volts) on the driver's side fender side of the fuse box. Was that when the key is turned on or with the key in the off position? Do you only have 12 volts on the one side either way?
Fuse 26 is hot on both sides with the fuse in.

With the fuse out 26 is only hot on the connector closest to the driver's fender. And it's the same no matter if the key is on or not.
 

Maverick

Member
If you have power at pink on the Evap solenoid (or at the fuse) when the key is off there is an issue in the fuse box/keyswitch, or someone else has done something. There should be no power at most of the fuses in that row (except the 25amp) when the key is off. Fuse 26 and the evap positive will have 12v the entire time the key switch is on, the solenoid is ground trigged from the PCM.

Everything is powered via the key switch (Thick Pink Wire on key switch), if the Key switch is off - and you have 0v on the Pink wire (which you should) there should be 0v at fuse 26. If you have 12v on pink with the key switch off, its backfeeding from somewhere, likely from something somebody added in and wired up incorrectly.

Does this truck have an aftermarket Car starter? Security system? has it ever been stolen? Where'd you get the 'new' fuse box from?
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Agreed. There is a short or something janky keeping that fuse, and that fuse only, powered. It's not the switch since he tried pulling it and there was no power at the pink wire. Very weird. And that it's doing the same with the original and replacement fuse box.

Basically, you're gonna have to do a a full trace of that wire from the fuse to the ignition switch.
 

Maverick

Member
Ya totally overlooked he checked the ignition pink already. FWIW, the evap solenoid is a non-critical element, if you want to invest the least amount of time... because its ground triggered you can run a wire from the evap solenoid positive to just about any other non critical circuit thats powered all the time when the key is on in the fuse box with an add-a-fuse and leave fuse 26 empty.

Thats the super lazy mans way of 'fixing' it. You really should do like Mooseman has said and continuity test (trace) the positive wire from the solenoid all the way back through the fuse box then the key switch. My bet is, with 0v on ign pink, you're going to find somewhere two wires ( a hot all the time and your evap hot) are shorted together. When the fuse box was changed did you notice anything wrong with the wire harness?
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
I am still not understanding the problem that is being expressed here. The original problem with a code (p0433) which appears to be addressed with the "rewire". The fact that fuse 26 has power in key off isn't necessarily a problem if as the poster indicated, no other fuse has the equivalent problem (power when it shouldn't have power).... hence that means power is going to a solenoid that only has a "draw" when the pcm requests it... and not at any other time. Thus the system is basically "OK". What's missing?
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
If you have power at pink on the Evap solenoid (or at the fuse) when the key is off there is an issue in the fuse box/keyswitch, or someone else has done something. There should be no power at most of the fuses in that row (except the 25amp) when the key is off. Fuse 26 and the evap positive will have 12v the entire time the key switch is on, the solenoid is ground trigged from the PCM.

Everything is powered via the key switch (Thick Pink Wire on key switch), if the Key switch is off - and you have 0v on the Pink wire (which you should) there should be 0v at fuse 26. If you have 12v on pink with the key switch off, its backfeeding from somewhere, likely from something somebody added in and wired up incorrectly.

Does this truck have an aftermarket Car starter? Security system? has it ever been stolen? Where'd you get the 'new' fuse box from?
Yes there is power at fuse 26 with the key off.

There is 0 at the pink ignition wire. But 12 volts at fuse 26. There is 12 volts at fuse 26 with the ignition switch completely removed.

There is absolutely nothing added to this truck. The NEW fuse block came from NUCAR Chevrolet. I went and got another one from the scrap yard. All 3 do the same thing. It ran great for awhile then sat for a couple months. Upon starting it up I had a p0449. I replaced the canister vent valve and the code went away. I was on my way to inspection when the check engine light came on. Now when I scanned it I had a p0443, a bunch of transmission electrical codes.
P0976 stored
P2764 pending
P2769 pending
P0973 pending
P0787 pending
Plus I noticed the next time I drove it the abs and skid light was on with a code C0110

I figured I'd start with the p0443 because it seemed the easiest to fix first.

I dont know if this means anything but the only thing I know that makes fuse 26 read 0 is there is a 125 mega fuse on the fuse box exposed between the block and the battery. Even if everything (positive cable, all the connectors) are unhooked the only thing to power up or take away power from fuse 26 is the thick black negative cable that hooks to that mega fuse.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Agreed. There is a short or something janky keeping that fuse, and that fuse only, powered. It's not the switch since he tried pulling it and there was no power at the pink wire. Very weird. And that it's doing the same with the original and replacement fuse box.

Basically, you're gonna have to do a a full trace of that wire from the fuse to the ignition switch.
I'm in the process of taking everything apart from the fuse box to the ignition now.

My question is what about the 2 wires that go to the vent valve by the gas tank. If 1 of them long wires has an issue(like a break or something) would that be causing any of these issues?
I have 12 volts at both wires when back probing them. I want to do a resistance check on them wires but they are so long. I guess I could buy some wire and make my leads longer, will that work?
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Yes there is power at fuse 26 with the key off.

There is 0 at the pink ignition wire. But 12 volts at fuse 26. There is 12 volts at fuse 26 with the ignition switch completely removed.

There is absolutely nothing added to this truck. The NEW fuse block came from NUCAR Chevrolet. I went and got another one from the scrap yard. All 3 do the same thing. It ran great for awhile then sat for a couple months. Upon starting it up I had a p0449. I replaced the canister vent valve and the code went away. I was on my way to inspection when the check engine light came on. Now when I scanned it I had a p0443, a bunch of transmission electrical codes.
P0976 stored
P2764 pending
P2769 pending
P0973 pending
P0787 pending
Plus I noticed the next time I drove it the abs and skid light was on with a code C0110

I figured I'd start with the p0443 because it seemed the easiest to fix first.

I dont know if this means anything but the only thing I know that makes fuse 26 read 0 is there is a 125 mega fuse on the fuse box exposed between the block and the battery. Even if everything (positive cable, all the connectors) are unhooked the only thing to power up or take away power from fuse 26 is the thick black negative cable that hooks to that mega fuse.
Nevermind on the question about the mega fuse. I just found out that the big black cable going to it is not negative but positive. Not really smart of Chevy to do that. So that explains the power. It's the dam power wire.
 

budwich

Well-Known Member
Well the story gets "BIGGER".... :smile: anyway, a wire that contains a fuse usually is "powered" regardless of color. That's why meters were created. :smile:

Further, with the "new information", my guess is that perhaps your valve wire may have acted as a "fuse" and possibly breaking because of an issue elsewhere..... maybe PCM.

Again, as suggested, do the resistance measurement to check the integrity of the valve control circuitry and go from there.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
Sorry I didn't know transmission problems affected the evap system. And since the evap code came up days before the transmission codes I figured that the evap should be addressed first. That's really crazy how there was a delay in the transmission codes.
I figured if I posted all the issues I'd be told hey let's start with 1 thing first, especially with whatever happened first.
I guess I'm learning about Chevy the hard way, I was definitely warned!

Anyway as stated in my last response to you or whoever wanted the resistance checked. It was 0.03

Sorry for the inconvenience. And Thank You for the help.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
I am still not understanding the problem that is being expressed here. The original problem with a code (p0433) which appears to be addressed with the "rewire". The fact that fuse 26 has power in key off isn't necessarily a problem if as the poster indicated, no other fuse has the equivalent problem (power when it shouldn't have power).... hence that means power is going to a solenoid that only has a "draw" when the pcm requests it... and not at any other time. Thus the system is basically "OK". What's missing?
The problem could be that the PCM might be putting these circuits to ground when powered off, which can be a problem if there isn't supposed to be power to them.

Depending on what you find while tracing the supply side of the fuse, it might be easier to just do as suggested and use another switched circuit to power those solenoids. A tap-a-fuse would work.

However, with this new info (again, please don't hold anything back), I'm leaning towards a wiring issue. They're not directly related but if there is a problem like burnt or chewed wires, they could be.
 
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Blueking25

Blueking25

Well-Known Member
The problem could be that the PCM might be putting these circuits to ground when powered off, which can be a problem if there isn't supposed to be power to them.

Depending on what you find while tracing the supply side of the fuse, it might be easier to just do as suggested and use another switched circuit to power those solenoids. A tap-a-fuse would work.

However, with this new info (again, please don't hold anything back), I'm leaning towards a wiring issue. They're not directly related but if there is a problem like burnt or chewed wires, they could be.
No matter if I have the pcm in the truck or unplugged I get the same reading at the fuse box.

I would love to find the problem because its definitely there. But if I could "rig" it and it would be ok I'd be ok with that also. Only problem is I still have the transmission codes and the abs code. And if I tried to take it through inspection they'd laugh.

Plus I have alot apart, the only wires I cant see are underneath the body. I'm in the process of undoing the harness from the box to the firewall.
 

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