Noob Buying Some Tools

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
Looking for ability to do basic repairs, change spark plugs, clean throttle bodies, hide dead hookers in secret compartments, the usual...

Started by looking at MAY03LT's videos where he said to get the following-
Hand tools: things for everyday jobs like maintenance, changing light bulbs, interior trim removal, things like that
Wheel and tire tools: Tools for safely supporting your vehicle and doing things like rotating tires, swapping wheels, checking brakes, etc.
Misc: Basic diagnostic stuff, test equipment, and service info

I had my eye on this stuff, but I think I may be overkilling it?:

  1. Shop Kobalt 227-Piece Standard/Metric Mechanic's Tool Set with Case at Lowes.com
  2. Shop Kobalt 1/2-in Drive Click 50 Ft-lbs - 250 Ft-lbs Torque Wrench at Lowes.com
  3. Shop Task Force Magnetic Mechanic Tray at Lowes.com
  4. Shop General Tools & Instruments Lighted Magnetic Pick-Up Tool at Lowes.com
  5. Corded LED Work Light Craftsman
  6. Jack, Jack Stands, and Creeper from Craftsman
  7. Shop Kobalt 4-Piece Hook and Pick Set at Lowes.com
  8. Shop Kobalt 10-Piece Pliers and Wrench Tool Set at Lowes.com
  9. Shop Task Force Long Handle Stainless Steel Brush at Lowes.com
  10. Shop Kobalt 1/2-in Breaker Bar at Lowes.com
  11. BAFX Products (TM) - PIC18F2480 Bluetooth OBD2 scan tool - For check engine light and other diagnostics - Android compatible : Amazon.com : Automotive
  12. Amazon.com: Lumax LX-1631 Green 3.75 Gallon Plastic Oil Drain Pan: Automotive
  13. ????Oil Filter Wrench (kind of overwhelmed by choices here)

I already have a workbench, a garage with lots of room, tape measure, 2 screwdrivers, needle nose pliers, some other type of pliers I'm unsure of the name (curved jaw locking?), a tire pressure gauge, digital air compressor for filling the tires, tire tread gauge, an extension cord, a drill, and a sledgehammer for fixing side view mirrors.
 

DDonnie

Member
Mar 26, 2012
2,631
I would suggest a pump for filling the transfer case and diffs, can't think of what they are called right now.
 

dmanns67

Member
Apr 3, 2013
32,979
Ohio
I purchased my 157 piece Craftsman mechanics tool set for about $80.00 a few years ago and have not ran into an issue that I did not have a tool for. Right now Sears has their 220 piece mechanics tool set on sale for $100 (50% off I believe).

If you plan on rotating your tires I would get (2) more jack stands. It will make the job quicker, plus I do not want a jack holding up my TB for an extended period of time. I would hate to have my jack fail and have the rear end/front end of the TB end up on the floor of my garage. They will also come in handy when it is time to change brake pads, paint calipers, plasti dip your wheels...

A good DeWalt drill and Dremel come in handy for different project work/mods. Good call on the magnetic pick up tool. I do not know how much time I have wasted trying to fish sockets out of the engine bay :hissyfit: lol. I have the same OBD2 scan tool and it works great.

You could probably add a digital multi-meter as well for diagnosing electrical issues. There are alot available for under $10.

If you are planning on doing any electrical work/mods, wire crimper/splicer will come in handy as well as terminal kit and quick splices.

Oil filter wrench, I would go with a oil filter cap wrench (76mm). Make sure you have a 3/8" drive extension to use with it for extra reach.
 

Sparky

Member
Dec 4, 2011
12,927
dmanns67 said:
I purchased my 157 piece Craftsman mechanics tool set for about $80.00 a few years ago and have not ran into an issue that I did not have a tool for. Right now Sears has their 220 piece mechanics tool set on sale for $100 (50% off I believe).

If you plan on rotating your tires I would get (2) more jack stands. It will make the job quicker, plus I do not want a jack holding up my TB for an extended period of time. I would hate to have my jack fail and have the rear end/front end of the TB end up on the floor of my garage. They will also come in handy when it is time to change brake pads, paint calipers, plasti dip your wheels...

A good DeWalt drill and Dremel come in handy for different project work/mods. Good call on the magnetic pick up tool. I do not know how much time I have wasted trying to fish sockets out of the engine bay :hissyfit: lol. I have the same OBD2 scan tool and it works great.

You could probably add a digital multi-meter as well for diagnosing electrical issues. There are alot available for under $10.

If you are planning on doing any electrical work/mods, wire crimper/splicer will come in handy as well as terminal kit and quick splices.

Oil filter wrench, I would go with a oil filter cap wrench (76mm). Make sure you have a 3/8" drive extension to use with it for extra reach.

I have just 2 jack stands and rotate my tires with them. I just do one side at a time. Jack up in the middle of the frame on one side, put a jack stand front and rear of the frame, pull the wheels on that side and swap them, drop it down, repeat on the other side.

I have a similar Craftsman set along with a few extra extensions and stuff. But I'm not shopping Craftsman anymore sadly after they've moved most of their stuff to China now :frown: That, and the mouthy attitude the lady at the counter gave me when I commented on it. Good way to drive off customers by insulting them (or trying to) :rolleyes: And making some really dumb comments about people in Japan living in mud huts :dunce: When I need more stuff I'll probably cough up the extra for Snap On.

A DMM is a great idea.
 

DDonnie

Member
Mar 26, 2012
2,631
Sparky said:
I have just 2 jack stands and rotate my tires with them. I just do one side at a time. Jack up in the middle of the frame on one side, put a jack stand front and rear of the frame, pull the wheels on that side and swap them, drop it down, repeat on the other side.

Are you just rotating front to back then? I was under the impression that this isnt as good of a pattern to use? Perhaps I'm incorrect. Either way, yes, it's possible with 2, but easier with 4. I have the 3ton stands from harbor freight and havent had any issues with them.
 

meerschm

Member
Aug 26, 2012
1,079
You will want to check out the harbor freight store near you.

good deals on good enough torque wrenches, you will need three sooner or later. cannot do the transmission pan with a 1/2 inch torque wrench. too strong.

and I like to go for impact sockets. and get the six point where ever possible. may also need deep sockets. metric should do it for the most part.

I would add a 3/8 breaker bar. a 3/8 with ratchet will come in handy if you do anything with the belt. too many adapters make it hard to rotate the tensioner, and a long one makes it a breeze. (try with a short one and you may smack your finger when it lets go.)

if you ever change the front hub bearings you will need a big socket for it. 36mm

may need an oxygen sensor socket.

for brakes, consider something like this bottle

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W7F2GI/?tag=gmtnation-20

and you may like
http://www.motiveproducts.com/ lets you bleed, flush and replace brake fluid without a buddy and much swearing.


also, go for a nice rolling tool box. better than keeping all your tools in boxes and laying all over the workbench and floor.
 

dmanns67

Member
Apr 3, 2013
32,979
Ohio
DDonnie said:
Are you just rotating front to back then? I was under the impression that this isnt as good of a pattern to use? Perhaps I'm incorrect. Either way, yes, it's possible with 2, but easier with 4. I have the 3ton stands from harbor freight and havent had any issues with them.

The rear tires moves to the front. The front driver's side moves to rear passenger side and front passenger side moves to rear driver's side. Like in the diagram below.

View attachment 28848

Now if you have directional tread then it is driver's side rear to driver's side front and driver's side front moves back to driver's side rear. Repeat on passenger side.
 

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DDonnie

Member
Mar 26, 2012
2,631
dmanns67 said:
That is why I mentioned (4) jack stands to make the process easier. The rear tires moves to the front. The front driver's side moves to rear passenger side and front passenger side moves to rear driver's side. Like in the diagram below.

View attachment 15376

Now if you have directional tread then it is driver's side rear to driver's side front and driver's side front moves back to driver's side rear. Repeat on passenger side.

Yes, I was agreeing with you. I was responding to sparky... :raspberry:
 

Sparky

Member
Dec 4, 2011
12,927
DDonnie said:
Are you just rotating front to back then? I was under the impression that this isnt as good of a pattern to use? Perhaps I'm incorrect. Either way, yes, it's possible with 2, but easier with 4. I have the 3ton stands from harbor freight and havent had any issues with them.

Yes, just front to back. I was told by someone that radial tires shouldn't switch side to side because of rotation direction changes. Probably more accurate for tires that are directional tread. However, I've gotten exceptionally good wear out of my tires on my vehicles from doing it this way (60k out of 50k rates tires and still counting) so it is hard to argue with that IMO :biggrin:
 

Conner299

Member
Jan 16, 2013
279
xtitan1 said:

I have used that style in the past, and the are a pain, IMHO. After watching Mayo's how-to videos, on changing diff and transfer case fluids, I went out and picked up one of these. I feel they are the easiest choice, for usage. Some guys use the amsoil style pump, some just put a length of tube on the bottle tip, I like the suction gun.

Powerbuilt Suction Gun | Product Details | Pep Boys
 

navigator

Member
Dec 3, 2011
504
I bought a small Kobalt set of sockets/ratchets from Lowes
8MM-18
1/4-3/4
deep and shallow well.
I busted the ratchet not from excesive torque but because I had a pull handle on it and it broke the F/R lever.
I tossed it not realizing I could have returned it.

All of my wrenches are HF special Pittsburgh, as mentioned you mostly need metric. I hardly ever use standard anymore unless I am working on the old boat or something.
I would but a decent socket set, an assortment of wrenches, a few sizes of adjustable wrenches, channel lock pliers, vice grips, a vice, some screw drivers. Specialty tools I kind of pick up as I need them.

BTW, I have a cheap Craftsman tool box from Sears, just a tip if you get one don't overload the drawers. I put stuff like hammers and pipe wrenches in the bottom drawer and it can't handle the weight. Make sure you try to distribute heavy tools in a cheap toolbox.
 

DDonnie

Member
Mar 26, 2012
2,631
navigator said:
I bought a small Kobalt set of sockets/ratchets from Lowes
8MM-18
1/4-3/4
deep and shallow well.
I busted the ratchet not from excesive torque but because I had a pull handle on it and it broke the F/R lever.
I tossed it not realizing I could have returned it.

All of my wrenches are HF special Pittsburgh, as mentioned you mostly need metric. I hardly ever use standard anymore unless I am working on the old boat or something.
I would but a decent socket set, an assortment of wrenches, a few sizes of adjustable wrenches, channel lock pliers, vice grips, a vice, some screw drivers. Specialty tools I kind of pick up as I need them.

BTW, I have a cheap Craftsman tool box from Sears, just a tip if you get one don't overload the drawers. I put stuff like hammers and pipe wrenches in the bottom drawer and it can't handle the weight. Make sure you try to distribute heavy tools in a cheap toolbox.

Yea, most of my tools are pittsburg tools as well. I believe HF hand tools have a warranty on them so if they break, take em back. Not the case with the power tools tho. I have the basic mechanic tool set from there, got it for 35 around christmas. Works great.


http://www.harborfreight.com/105-piece-tool-kit-4030.html
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
Holy moly, okay hopefully I've properly addressed everyone's generous advice. I've read everything you guys wrote 5 times over and have tried to research some good options. There's just so much stuff and so many different companies, it's really overwhelming for a new guy like me. My head is starting to spin. I know what most of this stuff is and what it's called and what it's used for, but like the pliers for instance I'm not even sure why you would use one type over another, so how much use am I really going to be getting out of them? I've tried to find just a tool guide for idiots, but it's all how-to's on an application of the tool, like the guides are organized by projects not by tools so you can't just look up what a tool is used for.

Here's what I came up with to add to my list.

Added to the list:


Differential Fluid / Brake Fluid Stuff People have suggested different things:


Lots of different opinions on best socket set to go with. I assume a set, and not buying everything individually, is the way to go?
I noticed some of the kits suggested don't have swivel sockets or extensions, so I would need to add those if I went with one of these kits. Also, they are all normal thickness sockets, as opposed to impact sockets, which some suggest I use because they are beefier. Which way do I go?


Still to come:
  • O2 socket
  • Rolling Tool Box/Cabinet/Cart whatever you call it

I forgot to add that I have a vice on my workbench so that at least is taken care of.

Oh, and as far as the drill, I was planning on getting a dewalt 18V combo kit of a drill/driver and impact driver for household stuff anyway. Would that allow me to use the impact driver on car stuff if I have the right sockets? Or would that risk stripping the bolts or whatever?
 

MAY03LT

Member
Nov 18, 2011
3,425
Delmarva
xtitan1 said:
and a sledgehammer for fixing side view mirrors

:rotfl:

dmanns67 said:
You could probably add a digital multi-meter as well for diagnosing electrical issues.

Good call sir.:yes:

xtitan1 said:
There's just so much stuff and so many different companies, it's really overwhelming for a new guy like me. My head is starting to spin. I know what most of this stuff is and what it's called and what it's used for, but like the pliers for instance I'm not even sure why you would use one type over another, so how much use am I really going to be getting out of them?

Sometimes stuff that could be removed with regular pliers isn't accessible. So then you'd use the ones with the 45 degree jaws. The pliers set in your first post might seem like overkill, but for the price it's a good deal. You never know when one of the oddball ones might save your bacon.


Here's what I came up with to add to my list.

Added to the list:
CTA Oil Filter Cap Wrench - 76mm x 14 Flute

The one I got for GM trucks including the 4.2 and 5.3 is this one. I have the 74/76 and it slips if the filter was last tightened by Hulk Hogan back when he had the 24" pythons.

Lots of different opinions on best socket set to go with. I assume a set, and not buying everything individually, is the way to go?

Yeah, mostly because the sets will have a case. It's easy to see if you forgot something under the hood if you can glance at the case and see an empty spot where the 10mm socket should be. When you get into more repairs, you'll see why the 10mm can be a major butthole.

A good example that I have for sets that I didn't buy is the standard 1/2" drive impact sockets. The trucks that I work on here at home have either 7/8" lugs or 15/16" lugs, so buying a whole set wasn't needed.
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
MAY03LT said:
Yeah, mostly because the sets will have a case. It's easy to see if you forgot something under the hood if you can glance at the case and see an empty spot where the 10mm socket should be. When you get into more repairs, you'll see why the 10mm can be a major butthole.

A good example that I have for sets that I didn't buy is the standard 1/2" drive impact sockets. The trucks that I work on here at home have either 7/8" lugs or 15/16" lugs, so buying a whole set wasn't needed.

I guess what I meant by set is something like this: Professional Mechanic's Tool Set - 301 Piece

So what you're saying to do instead is to buy socket sets, like 1/4" Drive Metric Deep Well Impact Sockets, 1/2", etc. and then buy pliers and extensions and stuff all separately so I can get exactly the stuff I want?
 

DDonnie

Member
Mar 26, 2012
2,631
xtitan1 said:
Oh, and as far as the drill, I was planning on getting a dewalt 18V combo kit of a drill/driver and impact driver for household stuff anyway. Would that allow me to use the impact driver on car stuff if I have the right sockets? Or would that risk stripping the bolts or whatever?

Just my own preference, but I would also get a dewalt corded drill. Corded are way faster and therefore come in handy when drilling through something.

If you plan to do any electrical mods, also get a GOOD set of strippers/cutters and a GOOD set off inline strippers. Also, and this is just me, a temperature controlled soldering iron is 100x easier to use then a cheap 15 watt iron.
 

triz

Member
Apr 22, 2013
746
Multi-Use Transfer Pump

I've used this pump and you can usually get on sale for like 4 bucks. Ive used it for the diffs, transmission, etc.

Good call on the 3/8 torque wrench. I have a 1/2 in one as well but the only time I really use that is when you get to torquing cross-members, and strut bolts etc.

Get a good one for the light stuff like oil pan bolts, valve cover etc.

I cant knock some of the HF stuff as I've had to get some tools on the fly. But I like a quality socket set. Some of the cheaper stuff doesn't exactly hold up or fit as snug as a set like Craftsman, Snap-on, Kobalt, etc.

A set of ratcheting wrenches.

Make sure you have some hex bolt, and t-set sockets. Those come in handy.
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
DDonnie said:
Just my own preference, but I would also get a dewalt corded drill. Corded are way faster and therefore come in handy when drilling through something.

If you plan to do any electrical mods, also get a GOOD set of strippers/cutters and a GOOD set off inline strippers. Also, and this is just me, a temperature controlled soldering iron is 100x easier to use then a cheap 15 watt iron.

I do (at least the side mirror turn signal mod) but I have no idea what the difference between GOOD and BAD is lol!

triz said:
Multi-Use Transfer Pump

I've used this pump and you can usually get on sale for like 4 bucks. Ive used it for the diffs, transmission, etc.

Good call on the 3/8 torque wrench. I have a 1/2 in one as well but the only time I really use that is when you get to torquing cross-members, and strut bolts etc.

Get a good one for the light stuff like oil pan bolts, valve cover etc.

I cant knock some of the HF stuff as I've had to get some tools on the fly. But I like a quality socket set. Some of the cheaper stuff doesn't exactly hold up or fit as snug as a set like Craftsman, Snap-on, Kobalt, etc.

A set of ratcheting wrenches.

Make sure you have some hex bolt, and t-set sockets. Those come in handy.

When you use the same pump for different oils, do you need to wash it out or something in between uses so that you don't cross-contaminate?

I think given all of this advice I may just get the Kobalt set Shop Kobalt 227-Piece Standard/Metric Mechanic's Tool Set with Case at Lowes.com since it has a lot of the stuff you guys are recommending all in it, then cross-check what it doesn't have and buy the rest. I think it's too good a deal to pass up since so much of what's in it I would have to buy anyway. The only problem is, none of it is impact, it's all regular socket stuff.

And btw, adding to the list is the snap-on filter wrench that MAY suggests: FW757715A, Wrench, Oil Filter, Cup, 75/77 mm instead of the one listed previously
 

Sparky

Member
Dec 4, 2011
12,927
I clean my transfer pump after every use.
 

triz

Member
Apr 22, 2013
746
Yes I clean it out whenever I use it. :thumbsup:
 

triz

Member
Apr 22, 2013
746
I have the socket one and used the open. I preferred the open.

- - - Updated - - -

I have the socket one and used the open. I preferred the open.
 

BoldAdventure

Member
Jun 28, 2012
1,634
Harbor Freights 8gal air compressor, a line of 50ft hose, an impact wrench and a air ratchet have made my life so much easier working on the truck. I don't understand why I never invested in this years before.

2 Horsepower, 8 gal., 125 PSI Portable Air Compressor

Plus they're having a huge sale this weekend. I'm actually going to upgrade my compressor because I think I'm going to mount the 8 gall inside the truck permanently. Could be very useful for break downs on the trail.
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
mikekey said:
Harbor Freights 8gal air compressor, a line of 50ft hose, an impact wrench and a air ratchet have made my life so much easier working on the truck. I don't understand why I never invested in this years before.

2 Horsepower, 8 gal., 125 PSI Portable Air Compressor

Plus they're having a huge sale this weekend. I'm actually going to upgrade my compressor because I think I'm going to mount the 8 gall inside the truck permanently. Could be very useful for break downs on the trail.

I had no idea you could run air tools off of an air compressor in that price range. I thought I would need like a $1000+ air compressor for that. Maybe I was thinking of media blasting.

J/C but what's the difference between an air ratchet and an impact wrench?
 

JamesL3

Member
Oct 16, 2013
401
Northfield, OH
xtitan1 said:
Looking for ability to do basic repairs, change spark plugs, clean throttle bodies, hide dead hookers in secret compartments, the usual...

QUOTE]

Can't have enough places to hide dead hookers! :rotfl:
 

BoldAdventure

Member
Jun 28, 2012
1,634
xtitan1 said:
I had no idea you could run air tools off of an air compressor in that price range. I thought I would need like a $1000+ air compressor for that. Maybe I was thinking of media blasting.

J/C but what's the difference between an air ratchet and an impact wrench?

Impact is going to to spin up and punch to break bolts loose with more torque. I have one that can do 125ft/lb. And a ratchet has less power. Think of the impact as having a breaker bar and the other as a normal wrench and your hand. Hopefully that makes sense.

But yes, I run all the tools I need to work on the Trailblazer, my GXP and Corvette with that thing. I can fill 1 and a half tires on the tank. It probably kicks on more than a larger tank, but it works well enough to get everything done.

For things like media blasting, and painting you are going to want something with higher PSI and a larger tank. Like you I guess I always assumed I need a $1000 setup and then a friend had one and we removed and rebuilt and engine over a weekend using it, and I told my wife and she bought it for me for Christmas.

Seriously worth every penny. Right behind my Craftsman 150pc Mechanics tool set, it's probably the one thing I use the most regularly in my garage now.

This is a good list you got in this thread.

One of my ideas is to put together a specific master tool list and sizes to carry for common off road breaks over on ORTB. Like which wrenches/sockets in what sizes to fix xzy.
 

meerschm

Member
Aug 26, 2012
1,079
mikekey said:
Harbor Freights 8gal air compressor, a line of 50ft hose, an impact wrench and a air ratchet have made my life so much easier working on the truck. I don't understand why I never invested in this years before.

2 Horsepower, 8 gal., 125 PSI Portable Air Compressor

Plus they're having a huge sale this weekend. I'm actually going to upgrade my compressor because I think I'm going to mount the 8 gall inside the truck permanently. Could be very useful for break downs on the trail.

what kind of power supply do you have on your truck to run a 2 HP 110 volt compressor? the spec is 14 amps at 110 VAC.
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
Yeah I'm curious about your idea of keeping it in the truck. You said permanently mount it to the truck, so do you mean the air compressor will actually ride inside the passenger compartment somewhere? Aren't the exhaust fumes going to be an issue?

Glancing at the manual it also says something about "Drain Tank daily and after use. Internal rust causes tank failure and explosion." and "Add correct amount of compressor oil before first use and every use. Operating with low or no oil causes permanent damage and voids warranty." That sounds like it could get messy for being inside a truck.


As far as a master list, that sounds like a great idea and is kind of what I was going for with this thread originally, but obviously your idea would be a more formal and official product (and therefore more useful) than just this collection of advice in this thread.

If the goal is to make a list of tools needed for common repairs, then step 1 is to make a list of all of those repairs. That list alone would be extremely helpful to somebody like me, although I realize probably some of them will be off-road specific. Then we could just go through and figure out the tools for each one, and let a computer program remove the dupes. Then you have your master list!

Right now I'm driving around with my entire tool collection in my trunk and it's rattling around and taking up a lot of space, and there's no need to keep more tools than I need in there as it adds extra weight and will just be that much more stuff I have to replace if it gets stolen.

I'm worried about using impact tools. I'm not sure if it was my cordless DeWalt 18v that did this or the tire shop, but this lug nut was almost impossible to get off:

The drill. I'm thinking it had to have been the shop, because I don't think this drill is powerful enough to do this damage, right? I got the idea that it's really meant for construction, like driving deck screws or lag bolts without needing to make pilot holes first. There's always occasions where I could use something like that, so that's the main reason I got it and figured why not throw in a 3/8" drive adapter and use it on the car as an added bonus.

This is the inverter I have. I only used it once but it's pretty damn simple to use:
EDIT: Just realized that if the compressor wants 110 volts at 14 amps that's 1540 Watts, and this thing is only 800 Watts, so this wouldn't get the job done. You'd need a second battery or something, right? Or do I not understand how electricity works lol, which is probably likely.
 

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BoldAdventure

Member
Jun 28, 2012
1,634
meerschm said:
what kind of power supply do you have on your truck to run a 2 HP 110 volt compressor? the spec is 14 amps at 110 VAC.

Dual battery, high output alt and a big ass inverter. It's not difficult. You don't even need a dual battery setup. I'm actually going to disassemble it from the tank. A few folks on ORTB have done different kinds of compressor and tank setups. Even more ideas if you visit a site like expo portal. Nothing new really.

Here are a few setups: http://forums.offroadtb.com/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=1904


xtitan1 said:
I'm worried about using impact tools. I'm not sure if it was my cordless DeWalt 18v that did this or the tire shop, but this lug nut was almost impossible to get off...

Shops are notorious for over torquing lug nuts and using the impact wrench to put them on. It would take twice as long if they had to read the torque spec for every car they work on and then walk around with a torque wrench and properly torque everything to spec. Most shops just throw a impact wrench on it and call it a day.
 

meerschm

Member
Aug 26, 2012
1,079
Power Bright 12-Volt DC to AC 2300 -Watt Power Inverter-PW2300-12 at The Home Depot

I guess something like this would work.

would need bigger vehicle alternator and an extra battery for much consistent use. (a little quick math will tell you that 12 amps at 120 volts is the same power as 12 volts at 120 amps. seems like a little derating would be in order for being away from the roads.

do you have other needs for the 110 VAC from the vehicle?

the offroad site looks like most of the setups use a 12 v dc powered pump. not like you want to run sandblasters or continuous impact tools. just an occasional tool and inflate the tires back up after playing around.

VIAIR Air Source Kit - 1.5, 2.0 Gallon Air Compressor Tank

something like this seems more practical for off road application. (of course it is hard to run a coffeemaker on compressed air)

:smile:
 

BoldAdventure

Member
Jun 28, 2012
1,634
meerschm said:
Power Bright 12-Volt DC to AC 2300 -Watt Power Inverter-PW2300-12 at The Home Depot

I guess something like this would work.

would need bigger vehicle alternator and an extra battery for much consistent use.

do you have other needs for the 110 VAC from the vehicle?

the offroad site looks like most of the setups use a 12 v dc powered pump. not like you want to run sandblasters or continuous impact tools. just an occasional tool and inflate the tires back up after playing around.

VIAIR Air Source Kit - 1.5, 2.0 Gallon Air Compressor Tank

something like this seems more practical for off road application. (of course it is hard to run a coffeemaker on compressed air)

:smile:

:hijack:

I should of mentioned the big three upgrade and a few other wiring upgrades. I'm a bit of a prepper, so let your imagination fly with other reasons why I want more power onboard. :thumbsup:
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
Well, he already has that compressor but wants to get a better one for his garage. So I think he was just thinking of a way to re-purpose it. Driving around with an air compressor in the back would be awesome. If you get a leak in your tire you can just run the air line out the window and flip that baby on and keep on drivin!:rotfl:
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
mikekey said:
Shops are notorious for over torquing lug nuts and using the impact wrench to put them on. It would take twice as long if they had to read the torque spec for every car they work on and then walk around with a torque wrench and properly torque everything to spec. Most shops just throw a impact wrench on it and call it a day.

Sorry, I said that in a misleading way. I meant it was hard to get off not because it was so tight (although you're right, they all were extremely over-torqued) but because they somehow stripped it enough that the socket would just rotate around the nut. My brother-in-law showed me a trick where he used a rubber mallet to jam the socket on the lug nut and we were able to get it to grab enough to crack it and get it off. I was just wondering if it was stripped due to an impact wrench, and if so, how easy is that to accidentally do?
 

The_Roadie

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Member
Nov 19, 2011
9,957
Portland, OR
meerschm said:
(of course it is hard to run a coffeemaker on compressed air)
I was tenting next to a group of girls one weekend (in the mountains - not the desert) who had some sort of Toyota or Honda small SUV with a built-in inverter. Must have been good for 100-200W. But they thought since it had a normal 120V receptacle that anything would work. Like an electric Mr. Coffee. Or the electric waffle iron they brought. Or a hair drier.

They accepted coffee I had made on my white gas stove with the Coleman version of the 10-cup drip coffeemaker.

They also discovered, as I've known for decades, that ONLY white gas is going to give you a decent flame at 30 degrees. Propane just doesn't have the vapor pressure, and they hadn't been smart enough to sleep with their little propane tanks in the sleeping bags overnight.

Noobs.
 

xtitan1

Original poster
Member
Jun 5, 2013
467
the roadie said:
I was tenting next to a group of girls one weekend (in the mountains - not the desert) who had some sort of Toyota or Honda small SUV with a built-in inverter. Must have been good for 100-200W. But they thought since it had a normal 120V receptacle that anything would work. Like an electric Mr. Coffee. Or the electric waffle iron they brought. Or a hair drier.

They accepted coffee I had made on my white gas stove with the Coleman version of the 10-cup drip coffeemaker.

They also discovered, as I've known for decades, that ONLY white gas is going to give you a decent flame at 30 degrees. Propane just doesn't have the vapor pressure, and they hadn't been smart enough to sleep with their little propane tanks in the sleeping bags overnight.

Noobs.

Why would they need to use a hair dryer when it's 30 degrees outside?
 

meerschm

Member
Aug 26, 2012
1,079
I am not sure I would advise driving around with 8 gallons of 115 psi air inside the cabin. the accidental release (like from an accident) would not be fun.

[video=youtube;KVP_A7eGYxw]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVP_A7eGYxw[/video]
 

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