NJ Inspection

NJTB

Silver Supporter
All,
Need a little help. Took my 04 TB for state inspection and it failed for " OBD systems, readiness status'. WTF is that?
I had driven it around town for about 20 minutes before going to the inspection station, thought it was warmed up enough. It did idle in line for about 15-20 minutes.
When I got it home, I put the Tech 2 on it. The TB was in closed loop, all the sensors were working, no CEL, temp was 201.
The report also said the cat converter and evap system wasn't ready. I checked that with the Tech 2, and all the sensors were working EXCEPT one that said 'waiting to purge'. If I remember correctly, there was one that only tests every once in a while.
Anyone got any ideas what was wrong?
 

TJBaker57

Well-Known Member
When were codes last cleared? It can sometimes take quite a while. For the emissions monitors to all be ready. It won't show as a code. Several OBD2 apps that work with the ELM327 will show the emissions readyness.
 

TJBaker57

Well-Known Member
Here is a saved report I have from OBD Fusion. It will give an idea of what sort of things are looked at..

Screenshot_20210908-221439.pngScreenshot_20210908-221447.png
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
Some Basic Training with (2) Videos:


The focused answer to your Question is in THIS one:


Check THIS TECH2PATHS.pdf for additional information on using your Tech 2 to work through the Monitors issues
 

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Mooseman

Moderator
If your state emissions testing allows for one of them to be not ready (like Ontario used to), then you can use the Tech 2 to get the evap done. It's in the service Bay tests. I had to use it when the evap and O2 sensors would not go ready. To do it, the tank must be between 1/4 and 3/4 full and above freezing.

If they don't allow any to not be ready, then you just have to keep driving it for the O2 sensors. They usually don't take that long but can if you just do short drives. Has to be from cold to full temp and repeat.
 
OP
N

NJTB

Silver Supporter
Thank you all for the replys, looks like I'm going to dive into this a little more.
What bothered me the most about this is the printout from the inspection station said the catalitic converter wasn't ready. I'm sure it was driven enough to light it off, and very sure I don't need one, no loss of power, etc. But one of the things I'm going to do is rap on it with a rubber hammer to be sure it's not broken up inside.
Then again, I could be overthinking the whole situation, maybe it just need a good run down the hiway to blow it out.
I'll post back Monday or Tuesday when I go back to inspection. Thanks again.
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
I had this happen on an 04 Monte Carlo (also in jersey) from the sounds of it it is missing the final purge seal test or whatever it is. The way I've almost always gotten it to run (I don't believe 04 let's you run the service bay test for it sadly) and I've had it several times in the tb after a dead battery... just start it from cold and get it up to about 50mph and hold it there for a minute or two. That has pretty much always forced it to run but iirc you need 2 drive cycles of it completing for it to register in the ECM.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
Maybe the catalyst thing is the post cat O2 sensor not ready so it's not giving a positive reading of the cat's efficiency
 
OP
N

NJTB

Silver Supporter
I had this happen on an 04 Monte Carlo (also in jersey) from the sounds of it it is missing the final purge seal test or whatever it is. The way I've almost always gotten it to run (I don't believe 04 let's you run the service bay test for it sadly) and I've had it several times in the tb after a dead battery... just start it from cold and get it up to about 50mph and hold it there for a minute or two. That has pretty much always forced it to run but iirc you need 2 drive cycles of it completing for it to register in the ECM.
Thanks, littleblazer. I'm hoping that's what it is.
Right now the TB does short runs, grocery store, etc. and I haven't driven it much since I took it to Utah. Not too worried about it now, but in the winter may be a problem.
Gonna hook up the tech 2 and take it for a ride down Rt. 78, see if the 'waiting for purge' test actually happens.
 

Ilikemy3s

Well-Known Member
I to live in NJ. Here is what I always do before the test.
IF you think you need an air filter, change it. If you think you are burning some oil, change it too. Once those are done, run the tank down to almost empty, then fill with top tier / quality gas like 93 octaine and take it for a nice long warmed up ride on 295 or the turnpike. Then take it to get inspected. Im at 232k miles on my 04 and it passes every time.
 

JerryIrons

Well-Known Member
I bought this $20 tester off of amazon, it actually has a section for testing all the emissions components, and will list each one and if it passes or fails. (ie evap monitor, o2 sensor, etc) You can see the systems listed on amazon. It's a nice tester for the price, I just keep it in the car to read my occasional P0017 that comes and goes :smile: You just know if I don't read that code it will be something else. Here in NY we are allowed to fail one parameter.


Comes in very handy when an inspection is coming up and I can verify that I will pass the emissions part, in the past I've failed that thing more than once and it was annoying as you know what.
 
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OP
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NJTB

Silver Supporter
Littleblazer, you got it. Hooked up the Tech 2, cold start, drove about 2 miles to Rt.12, hit 50 for about 30 seconds, and the purge seal test passed.
I guess since I'm just driving it around town and rarely hit hi way speed, it wouldn't test for it, Tech2 said waiting to purge.
Going to do it a few more times this weekend and go back to inspection Monday or Tuesday.
For the bonus, as I was coming home, the volt guage started dropping, then going back to 14v. Busy this weekend, check that out Monday, too.
This TB is nitpicking me to death.
 

JerryIrons

Well-Known Member
There is a GM procedure to follow to get past the emissions test as well:

General Motors Driving Cycle​


A complete driving cycle should perform diagnostics on all systems. A complete driving cycle can be done in under fifteen minutes.


To perform an OBDII Driving cycle do the following:

  1. Cold Start. In order to be classified as a cold start the engine coolant temperature must be below 50°C (122°F) and within 6°C (11°F) of the ambient air temperature at startup. Do not leave the key on prior to the cold start or the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.
  2. Idle. The engine must be run for two and a half minutes with the air conditioner on and rear defroster on. The more electrical load you can apply the better. This will test the O2 heater, Passive Air, Purge "No Flow", Misfire and if closed loop is achieved, Fuel Trim.
  3. Accelerate. Turn off the air conditioner and all the other loads and apply half throttle until 88km/hr (55mph) is reached. During this time the Misfire, Fuel Trim, and Purge Flow diagnostics will be performed.
  4. Hold Steady Speed. Hold a steady speed of 88km/hr (55mph) for 3 minutes. During this time the O2 response, air Intrusive, EGR, Purge, Misfire, and Fuel Trim diagnostics will be performed.
  5. Decelerate. Let off the accelerator pedal. Do not shift, touch the brake or clutch. It is important to let the vehicle coast along gradually slowing down to 32km/hr (20 mph). During this time the EGR, Purge and Fuel Trim diagnostics will be performed.
  6. Accelerate. Accelerate at 3/4 throttle until 88-96 km/hr (55-60mph). This will perform the same diagnostics as in step 3.
  7. Hold Steady Speed. Hold a steady speed of 88km/hr (55mph) for five minutes. During this time, in addition to the diagnostics performed in step 4, the catalyst monitor diagnostics will be performed. If the catalyst is marginal or the battery has been disconnected, it may take 5 complete driving cycles to determine the state of the catalyst.
  8. Decelerate. This will perform the same diagnostics as in step 5. Again, don't press the clutch or brakes or shift gears.

Reprinted on OBDII web site courtesy of General Motors Corporation
Š General Motors Corporation
 

Beacon

Well-Known Member
I to live in NJ. Here is what I always do before the test.
IF you think you need an air filter, change it. If you think you are burning some oil, change it too. Once those are done, run the tank down to almost empty, then fill with top tier / quality gas like 93 octaine and take it for a nice long warmed up ride on 295 or the turnpike. Then take it to get inspected. Im at 232k miles on my 04 and it passes every time.
This, plus one bottle of dry gas, and a can of sea foam, was what I used to do for tailpipe emissions tests. Anything would pass with that combo.
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
Littleblazer, you got it. Hooked up the Tech 2, cold start, drove about 2 miles to Rt.12, hit 50 for about 30 seconds, and the purge seal test passed.
I guess since I'm just driving it around town and rarely hit hi way speed, it wouldn't test for it, Tech2 said waiting to purge.
Going to do it a few more times this weekend and go back to inspection Monday or Tuesday.
For the bonus, as I was coming home, the volt guage started dropping, then going back to 14v. Busy this weekend, check that out Monday, too.
This TB is nitpicking me to death.
Glad to have helped. :tiphat:
This, plus one bottle of dry gas, and a can of sea foam, was what I used to do for tailpipe emissions tests. Anything would pass with that combo.
Oddly enough I tried guaranteed to pass or whatever else bottled stuff was around or on sale at the auto parts store when the cats in the escalade were questionable... below 60 degrees ambient it would throw a code and above it wouldn't... being inspection was March you took a gamble on if it would clear on the one or two nice days we had. The one time I did try it it did clear, so I ran over and it still failed the sniffer... some NJ stations still test sniffer depending on what the scanner sees. So I left with that quarter tank, topped back off came back an hour later and it passed. I'd assume depending on how close to total failure certain things are... chemicals like that being added will actually hurt. I never looked at the chemicals inside those types of cleaners but they're all probably organic cyclo types that the emissions testers are looking for... so a poor burn could be made worse by adding in more?
 
OP
N

NJTB

Silver Supporter
Went to inspection yesterday and passed.
Thank you for all the suggestions everyone.
Over the weekend I decided to play with the Tech 2 a bit to check things out. So, Saturday morning I hooked it up and went to a friends house about 40 miles away. Cold start, hit the hi way 5 minutes later, no purge. WTF. Did the same thing Sunday, no purge, but all the parameters for all the sensors were within range both days.
Now I'm overthinking this to the max, not really understanding why it decided to purge one day and not the next, with everthing being otherwise normal.
I got out of the car buisness in the early 90's, and then, if the scanner said 'closed loop', the car was ready to go. I did notice the TB went into closed loop real quick, like 30 seconds.
Frustrated, I drove it on the hiway about 10 minutes, then to inspection. If it failed, I'd have it inspected at a shop.
At least I have 2 years on a good sticker.
 

TJBaker57

Well-Known Member
Vacuum slosh I believe is related to the measurement of the fuel tank pressure which is a negative in relation to atmospheric pressure. Sounds like they want to see a stable value there, the fuel isn't sloshing around in the tank from a rough road condition maybe?

First parameter is atmospheric pressure, must be great than 74 kPa. I'm at 8200 feet elevation where my atmospheric is only 75 kPa, I barely make the cut there. Sea level is about 101.3 kPa.

Second line is the startup engine coolant temperature. Must be greater than 4° C and less than 30 ° C.

Third line is startup intake air temperature. Same conditions as the startup coolant temperature.

Next line is checking the difference between the two, startup intake air temp vs startup coolant temp. The must be within 8° C of each other with the coolant being no wamer than the intake air temp + 8° C.

Once again, these are just conditions that must be met before most EVAP tests will even run. So like if your gas tank is full then it doesn't matter how long you drive around, the purge test is not going to run because the tank is over 85% full.
 
There is a GM procedure to follow to get past the emissions test as well:

General Motors Driving Cycle​


A complete driving cycle should perform diagnostics on all systems. A complete driving cycle can be done in under fifteen minutes.


To perform an OBDII Driving cycle do the following:

  1. Cold Start. In order to be classified as a cold start the engine coolant temperature must be below 50°C (122°F) and within 6°C (11°F) of the ambient air temperature at startup. Do not leave the key on prior to the cold start or the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.
  2. Idle. The engine must be run for two and a half minutes with the air conditioner on and rear defroster on. The more electrical load you can apply the better. This will test the O2 heater, Passive Air, Purge "No Flow", Misfire and if closed loop is achieved, Fuel Trim.
  3. Accelerate. Turn off the air conditioner and all the other loads and apply half throttle until 88km/hr (55mph) is reached. During this time the Misfire, Fuel Trim, and Purge Flow diagnostics will be performed.
  4. Hold Steady Speed. Hold a steady speed of 88km/hr (55mph) for 3 minutes. During this time the O2 response, air Intrusive, EGR, Purge, Misfire, and Fuel Trim diagnostics will be performed.
  5. Decelerate. Let off the accelerator pedal. Do not shift, touch the brake or clutch. It is important to let the vehicle coast along gradually slowing down to 32km/hr (20 mph). During this time the EGR, Purge and Fuel Trim diagnostics will be performed.
  6. Accelerate. Accelerate at 3/4 throttle until 88-96 km/hr (55-60mph). This will perform the same diagnostics as in step 3.
  7. Hold Steady Speed. Hold a steady speed of 88km/hr (55mph) for five minutes. During this time, in addition to the diagnostics performed in step 4, the catalyst monitor diagnostics will be performed. If the catalyst is marginal or the battery has been disconnected, it may take 5 complete driving cycles to determine the state of the catalyst.
  8. Decelerate. This will perform the same diagnostics as in step 5. Again, don't press the clutch or brakes or shift gears.

Reprinted on OBDII web site courtesy of General Motors Corporation
Š General Motors Corporation
Do this. It worked for me. Once it took about 2 miles and only got through the first few steps, and another time o had to drive into the next county before all the test were completed and the computer turned the check engine light off.
 
OP
N

NJTB

Silver Supporter
Vacuum slosh I believe is related to the measurement of the fuel tank pressure which is a negative in relation to atmospheric pressure. Sounds like they want to see a stable value there, the fuel isn't sloshing around in the tank from a rough road condition maybe?

First parameter is atmospheric pressure, must be great than 74 kPa. I'm at 8200 feet elevation where my atmospheric is only 75 kPa, I barely make the cut there. Sea level is about 101.3 kPa.

Second line is the startup engine coolant temperature. Must be greater than 4° C and less than 30 ° C.

Third line is startup intake air temperature. Same conditions as the startup coolant temperature.

Next line is checking the difference between the two, startup intake air temp vs startup coolant temp. The must be within 8° C of each other with the coolant being no wamer than the intake air temp + 8° C.

Once again, these are just conditions that must be met before most EVAP tests will even run. So like if your gas tank is full then it doesn't matter how long you drive around, the purge test is not going to run because the tank is over 85% full.
Thank you for the explination. I never heard of vaccum slosh and had no idea it even existed (short of something like astrophysics).
Given those parameters, the test seems like it should only run a few times a year. In the winter on a good cold day, or the summer on a hot day won't run?
I was thrilled after @littleblazer's post, drove for about 5 minutes and the test ran and passed. Then on subsequent starts over the next few days, nothing. Had me wondering.
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
Thank you for the explination. I never heard of vaccum slosh and had no idea it even existed (short of something like astrophysics).
Given those parameters, the test seems like it should only run a few times a year. In the winter on a good cold day, or the summer on a hot day won't run?
I was thrilled after @littleblazer's post, drove for about 5 minutes and the test ran and passed. Then on subsequent starts over the next few days, nothing. Had me wondering.
It's still finicky even for mine. The method I explained to you for me has only worked in the cooler months iirc. If you start the day at 32 it's easy for IAT and CTS to be about the same. Both the TB and escalade were January or April iirc. So relatively cool. But I'm glad it got you through.
 

Mooseman

Moderator
I know from experience doing the service bay test of the evap on the Tech 2, Temp has to be above freezing and the tank between 1/4 and 3/4 to run the test. The test involves idling and a highway drive at a specific speed for a specified distance (10km IIRC). It's the most finicky test, which is why Ontario, when they had e-testing, allowed for one to not be ready as it sometimes never runs during the winter months.
 

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