Making A/C Complete Repairs "EZ-PZ" on an '02 Silverado 5.3L

MRRSM

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#1
Why I am being bedeviled by HVAC problems has GOT to have something to do with Werner Heisenberg's “Uncertainty Principle”… in essence ...”What You Study… You Also Change ...the moment you even LOOK at it...”. In this case, I had merely raised my hood to give my 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 5.3L Engine Bay some admiring glances this morning… and then as soon as I started the Truck up… My A/C crapped out! Damn You, Florida!

The arrival of my inexpensive GM 2000-2006 Chevrolet Silverado “PDF Manuals on a DVD” have proven to be absolutely priceless as they allow one to conveniently get that OEM “Factory Fresh” look at how the official Diagnostic Procedures and R&R imagery come into play here. BUT… adding to that supreme advantage was finding these two co-related Youtube Repair Videos that are just chock full of good, live Diagnostic and Repair instructions of “How To Repair the ENTIRE A/C System on a Full Sized Chevrolet Silverado Pick-Up Truck”. Now even though I am “Uncertain” about what the exact problems are in play here right now… having all these Data/Videos at hand will “certainly” make the finding and fixing procedures much more pleasurable and direct.

The Last Cool Aspect of this matter is that these two videos are being well covered by the SAME Mechanic on the SAME Vehicle on two separate occasions… and also happens to be a 2000 Year… just like Mine:

I Love It when a Plan Comes Together :>)

The “How-To” Condenser/Accumulator-Drier/Orifice Tube R&R:


RockAuto offers quite a few A/C Condenser Coils for this Vehicle… with the OEM ACDelco flavor offered for around $100.00

… Then the “How-To” for the OEM Delphi Updated A/C Compressor R&R:


If it comes down to having to do this Compressor R&R ...RockAuto has both the OEM GM ACDelco and the alternative OEM Delphi flavor… for around $210.00:

https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog...6,heat+&+air+conditioning,a/c+compressor,6628

...and again... RockAuto has the Orifice and Accumulator-Drier as well:

Orifice Tube:

https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog...heat+&+air+conditioning,a/c+orifice+tube,6936

Accumulator- (Receiver-Drier):

https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog...tioning,a/c+receiver+drier+/+accumulator,6972

Finally... The PAG 150 Refrigerant Oil is available at your local Autozone, etc… and also via Amazon in the OEM ACDelco variety:

https://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-15-1...e=UTF8&qid=1529864560&sr=8-3&keywords=pag+150

This is Important:

One Critical Observation I would make between these two Youtube Videos is that the Mechanic notes that he did NOT actually place enough PAG 150 Refrigerant Oil into EACH NEW COMPONENT during his initial repair and likewise needed to add MORE PAG 150 Oil to the Compressor during the second Video, Since this system takes 8 Ounces of PAG Oil... it makes sense to distribute the PAG Oil between the Major Components..such as B4 installing the Condenser Coil in the front of the Radiator.

First, Tilt the New Condenser on its side and use a small Funnel to introduce about 2 Ounces of PAG Oil directly into the LOW SIDE Port... so the PAG Oil will travel from the LOW Side... through the entire Condenser prior to being pushed under higher pressure back to the Compressor. It is important to remember that whenever NEW components are being replaced for the OLD ones... whatever residual Old PAG OIL is residing inside of them is being removed right along with that Old Gear... so it MUST be replaced by pouring back in the right oil and in the proper amounts into the New Gear.

Also... that means placing around 3 Ounces into the Accumulator-Drier for the same reasons... and lastly.. a minimum of 2 Ounces needs to be fed into the open LOW Side Suction Line Port on the New Compressor and Hand Turned at LEAST 10 Xs to pre-lubricate the Scroll Chamber deep inside, In this way... the New PAG Oil will be more uniformly distributed throughout the entire repaired AC System.
 
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MRRSM

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
#2
After spending around two very uncomfortable hours driving my "Double Aught" Silverado around without any A/C and realizing that with October still behaving as though it were July down here in Florida... I finally decided to order components needed for a Complete Replacement of everything critical in the Air Conditioning System Under The Hood from Amazon AND RA (RockAuto).

This is an (18) Year Old Truck; well-pampered before I came to become the latest Owner... and I figure that as long as I am down there... in the Belly of The Beast... I might as well eliminate anything else in what might eventually become a Cascade Chain for A/C Parts Failure and do the job Royally, Loyally... Correct. But... Knowing "Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle" as well as I do means that while I am at the the task of doing this work... it will probably start Snowing.

For the sake of adding new content to the Full Size GM Trucks sub-forum... I'm also holding to using strictly OEM Delphi and/or ACDelco Components and will compliment the two Videos listed above with some still shots of the Step By Steps involved in performing this R&R. Based upon what I have seen in the Videos... This job will become a LOT easier for me since I have the chance to use my Brand New Fire Engine Red, Double Locking Giant Jack Stands and report on how they perform as well:

ACDELCOACCONDENSOR1.jpg ACDELCOOEMACSWITCHES.jpg DELPHIOEMACCOMPRESSORKIT.jpg 41mwRHGrHzL.jpg 41xQB+gVIrL.jpg 417LIUcWWgL.jpg 411qnbgTE4L.jpg 61NWQwF2ydL._SL1000_.jpg 61vq9mNuhqL._SL1000_.jpg
 
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MRRSM

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
#3
It took more time than I expected for all of these components to all arrive.... but now that they're all here... I took some images for future reference by anyone considering doing this HVAC R&R. The only thing I showed with just the ACDelco Label... is the Cardboard Box End for the A/C Condenser Coil. Once I get the other Silverado Leather OEM Seat issue solved in another Thread... I'll "Turn Two" on this one and image document these HVAC Swap Step-By-Step Procedures.

One caution is worth mentioning here and I'll repeat this in due course: Do NOT Pressure Flush the Old A/C System Components with the A/C Pressure Hoses installed using any A/C Flush Canister Fluid. Doing so will strip the special coating applied to the inside of the Flex-Aluminum Lines that is there to prevent seepage of the R-134A Freon and leaks penetrating those special rubber tubes. In a case like this... Disassembling everything and Isolating the Evaporator Coil and the Condenser Coil if they are NOT being replaced for single component Flush Outs is the better option before installing anything Brand New as shown in these Images :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/126111508@N07
 
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