California bans the sale of small gas powered equipment

Mooseman

Master Blaster
Moderator
I can see older more polluting equipment getting dumped into CA. They can't regulate used stuff.

The ironic part is what are you gonna use to charge your chainsaw batteries in the middle of nowhere if you can't use a gas generator? Solar isn't practical or portable enough yet for that. I can see home equipment being rechargeable but more industrial applications is going to be impractical. And doesn't California have electrical supply issues?
 

northcreek

Guru
Thread Starter
California has:
1. a major oil spill off it's coast.
2. continuos wildfire.
3. dwindling fresh water supply.
4. mudslides.
5. San Andreas Fault looming.
And the fix is....wait for it.....leaf blower ban :2thumbsup:
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
Electric works great for small properties or quick clean ups. I have both. I will say the gas lawn mower is more convenient however since it takes me roughly 20 bags to do the back yard at 2x a week... thats a lot of batteries.
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
I realize that the Ryobi Riding Electric Lawn Mower is one BIG expense at the outset. But Boy... Can THAT thing perform at Full Tilt for 2.5 Hours with the Four 100AH Battery Pack underneath it. If you MUST get something like this to meet the CA standards... check them out on YT.

Besides me and @Blckshdw, we're the only people I know around here in Florida right now who could actually cut their grass at 1:00 AM and get away with it (Yup... Decent Headlights) if we were crazy enough to do so:

RYOBIELECTRICLAWNMOWER.jpg
 

flyboy2610

Registered Member
With the push for electric motors in more and more items, one question needs to be asked that I seldom see addressed: where is all the electricity going to come from to recharge all these batteries? Maybe from all these new power plants that are(n't) being built?
 

Blckshdw

Likes lights and stuff
Moderator
With the push for electric motors in more and more items, one question needs to be asked that I seldom see addressed: where is all the electricity going to come from to recharge all these batteries? Maybe from all these new power plants that are(n't) being built?

Going solar is a pretty popular trend in my area. A few homes popped up with it a few years ago, put the idea in my head. Jumped in myself, and now a bunch of other neighbors are doing it too. It's a big financial hit up front, but the long term investment pays for itself eventually. And after that, it starts paying you. Of course that only plays out, if you plan to stay put. :yes:
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
Going solar is a pretty popular trend in my area. A few homes popped up with it a few years ago, put the idea in my head. Jumped in myself, and now a bunch of other neighbors are doing it too. It's a big financial hit up front, but the long term investment pays for itself eventually. And after that, it starts paying you. Of course that only plays out, if you plan to stay put. :yes:
When my friend sold her house she wrote a contract that she gets the money for the credit on the panels in exchange that the new owners have no electric bill. Doesn't amount to much but 200 a month is 200 a month. The other side is she is responsible for repairs which depending, have zeroed out a couple years of gains. Electronics can be expensive but she took it as a loan against her house at the time and 100% owns every aspect of it outright now. If I do it I would go that route for sure. No company as a middle man. :thumbsup:
 

MRRSM

Lifetime VIP Supporter
Just a Word to The Wise... @Blckshdw... With the "Google Earth" images of the surface of the USA being sucked up from the Internet by every Local Government Agency and Private Insurance Agency for Property Improvement Taxation and liability issues for directed land use facilities... don't be surprised if Duke Energy has already jumped onto the Solar Panel Band Wagon.

They can do this by simply plugging into your system right at the side of your house and take whatever they want right back into THEIR Grid. They can tap off what they will deem is "excess solar power" that they cannot sell any to you as an "Independent Power Producer". The Fine Print in the State Law might allow them to do so right now, so it is worth checking into the matter and be forewarned.
 

Blckshdw

Likes lights and stuff
Moderator
Just a Word to The Wise... @Blckshdw... With the "Google Earth" images of the surface of the USA being sucked up from the Internet by every Local Government Agency and Private Insurance Agency for Property Improvement Taxation and liability issues for directed land use facilities... don't be surprised if Duke Energy has already jumped onto the Solar Panel Band Wagon.

They can do this by simply plugging into your system right at the side of your house and take whatever they want right back into THEIR Grid. They can tap off what they will deem is "excess solar power" that they cannot sell any to you as an "Independent Power Producer". The Fine Print in the State Law might allow them to do so right now, so it is worth checking into the matter and be forewarned.

Thankfully that's not the case for me. I've got TECO, and they happily buy back excess energy production. Had a bidirectional meter installed with my package, and I have itemized lines on my bill for how much I've pulled from the grid, and how much I've put in. They use a 12 month period, and if you have a surplus of energy credit after those 12 months, they'll cut you a check. Works out nicely since I tend to generate my energy surplus in the cooler months, and then siphon off those credits in the summer with the AC running. Been pretty much breaking even, which is fine by me. :thumbsup:
 

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