95 Silverado 16 to 17" Wheel Upgrade

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#1
Currently have worn out Fuzion SUV (Chinese junk) 265/75R16 tires on the stock wheels on my GMT400. I have an opportunity to get a free set of tires of pretty much any reasonable common size I want. I'm thinking of taking this opportunity to upgrade my wheels as well - I was looking for used newer body style stock Chevy wheels which are 17x7 (cheaply available on Craigslist for about $100 for a set). The identical tire size as what I have but for the 17" wheels is 265/70R17 which is the stock size for many of the newer trucks, so I could go with that. Will this work on my truck without modification? I'm clueless when it comes to offset and backspacing...

If I did a torsion bar leveling kit what is the next common tire size up on the 17" wheels that I could use? I found 235/80R17 which is ever so slightly taller but quite a bit narrower. That might look weird? There is also 285/70R17 but they are only suitable for use in 7.5-9" wheels and the wheels I'm looking at are 17x7... I can buy 17x8 wheels but they are more expensive. Assuming I do buy 17x8 wheels, will a simple 1-3" leveling kit give me the clearance I need with the 285/70R17 tires?

Thanks... any input appreciated!
 
#2
Bigger issue would be bolt pattern. Many 90s Chevy 1/2 tons had 5 lugs. It wasn't until very late 90s they went to 6 lugs.
 
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shovenose

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#3
Bigger issue would be bolt pattern. Many 90s Chevy 1/2 tons had 5 lugs. It wasn't until very late 90s they went to 6 lugs.
I have a 4WD so it is indeed 6 lugs. I've done a little research and the bolt pattern seems to be the same and the newer wheels should bolt right up. Am I wrong?
 
#4
You should have no issue then. I've seen newer silverado wheels on older 6 lug no issues.
 
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shovenose

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#5
You should have no issue then. I've seen newer silverado wheels on older 6 lug no issues.
thanks! do you think i can fit the larger tires and 17x8 wheels with a leveling kit or should i stick to the 17x7 wheels and similar size tires to what i have now?
 

TollKeeper

Well-Known Member
#6
For what size tire based on rim you want, to offer an opinion, I would have to know what kind of truck it is and the driving you do..

For a truck that you just drive around town, no off-roading, few long trips, etc, I would say you could do any size you really wanted, realizing that you will loose a bit of comfort for every inch of rim size you go up.

If you do off-roading, towing, long trips, etc, I would suggest staying with the 17's. More road comfort for the trips, more rubber to guard in off-roading, etc.

You can find the 17's, 18's, and even 20's, pretty reasonable. I like the look of the 20's, but you might not be able to get the sized rubber you like with them.

My old 95 Chevy Silverado 1500 NA Diesel had the 6 lug, and I swapped them for the 20's, and it looked pretty good, ride was compromised a bit, but the truck was literally an in town only truck, so I was OK with it.
 
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shovenose

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#7
For what size tire based on rim you want, to offer an opinion, I would have to know what kind of truck it is and the driving you do..

For a truck that you just drive around town, no off-roading, few long trips, etc, I would say you could do any size you really wanted, realizing that you will loose a bit of comfort for every inch of rim size you go up.

If you do off-roading, towing, long trips, etc, I would suggest staying with the 17's. More road comfort for the trips, more rubber to guard in off-roading, etc.

You can find the 17's, 18's, and even 20's, pretty reasonable. I like the look of the 20's, but you might not be able to get the sized rubber you like with them.

My old 95 Chevy Silverado 1500 NA Diesel had the 6 lug, and I swapped them for the 20's, and it looked pretty good, ride was compromised a bit, but the truck was literally an in town only truck, so I was OK with it.
Basically I just drive it around town, some longer highway trips, but very occasional towing/hauling and light off-roading is possible.

I want it to look a little cooler and a little more trucky. I do think the 17 is the best wheel option for me - I have no interest in 18s or 20s as I want to keep plenty of sidewall for ride quality and looks.

I'm mainly trying to determine whether 17x7s with the 265/70R17 tires or the 17x8s with the 285/70R17 tires is a better option and if both would fit without any modification or a torsion bar leveling kit.

Thank you!!
 

TollKeeper

Well-Known Member
#8
If I remember correctly, the 285/70R17 will fit fine, as long as you don't go any larger. The 285/70R17 is basically a 33", and is quite literally the maximum you can go.
 
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shovenose

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#9
If I remember correctly, the 285/70R17 will fit fine, as long as you don't go any larger. The 285/70R17 is basically a 33", and is quite literally the maximum you can go.
Great, thanks. Looks like I may as well go with the 33s since I am not paying for them. I just have to buy more expensive 17x8 wheels. If I have a problem with rubbing I can put in the leveling kit. Does that make sense?
 
#10
You'll probably need a bit of negative offset. The red truck with 245 75r16s rubs at full lock with a roughly zero offset. The negative offset ARs with 265 75r16s didn't even come close. That's a 2wd 3500 though. I'm not sure how the 4wd is clearance wise.
 
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shovenose

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#11
You'll probably need a bit of negative offset. The red truck with 245 75r16s rubs at full lock with a roughly zero offset. The negative offset ARs with 265 75r16s didn't even come close. That's a 2wd 3500 though. I'm not sure how the 4wd is clearance wise.
Hmm. Negative offset is the opposite of using wheel spacers right?
 
#12
Negative offset pushes the tire outward. Spacers do the same thing but if you're buying wheels you might as well buy them with the offset you need instead of buying wheels and then buying spacers on top of that. Plus, it is technically safer to not use spacers (one less possible point of failure, even though a proper spacer isn't really unsafe).
 
#13
I did not think 33s cleared on those body styles stock.

I would go with the 265-70 17 on 17x8 in case you want to lift and go to 285s or bigger later.
 
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shovenose

shovenose

Well-Known Member
#14
OK, thanks. I picked LT285/70R17. If they don't fit and I can't deal with lifting it I can just sell them since they were free.

Used wheels with a set of spacers might still end up cheaper than the "correct" wheels. We shall see!
 
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#15
Used wheels in 6x5.5 are easy to find and no need spacers more than likely.

Or new is only $360 delivered with the discounts at Discount Tire Direct.

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Reprise

Lifetime VIP Supporter
#16
FYI - I've been looking at options for my 1500HD (8 lug), and found this thread helpful. So now I'll hijack it...LOL

My latest '03 came with H2 rims / tires (17 x 8.5; 315/70 (!), stock height (I'm pretty sure the previous owner made a few turns on the torsion adjustment bolts). The front passenger tire does rub against the inner fender, so I want to get a narrower tire, at a minimum. Looking at the H2, the 315s were actually the stock width, so I'll most likely completely swap tires *and* rims, now.

Usage is as a secondary (non-daily driver) with emphasis on towing...so I lean toward highway all-seasons (the only off-roading I'll see is from the secondary road to the next campsite...lol). And I need LR 'E', which further sacrifices ride comfort (understandably). So a taller aspect is better for me, all things equal.
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
#17
FYI - I've been looking at options for my 1500HD (8 lug), and found this thread helpful. So now I'll hijack it...LOL

My latest '03 came with H2 rims / tires (17 x 8.5; 315/70 (!), stock height (I'm pretty sure the previous owner made a few turns on the torsion adjustment bolts). The front passenger tire does rub against the inner fender, so I want to get a narrower tire, at a minimum. Looking at the H2, the 315s were actually the stock width, so I'll most likely completely swap tires *and* rims, now.

Usage is as a secondary (non-daily driver) with emphasis on towing...so I lean toward highway all-seasons (the only off-roading I'll see is from the secondary road to the next campsite...lol). And I need LR 'E', which further sacrifices ride comfort (understandably). So a taller aspect is better for me, all things equal.
On the 2500s, I know 265/75r16 looks nice at stock height and 285 is about as large as you can go before rubbing without changing things.
 

Reprise

Lifetime VIP Supporter
#18
I was thinking about 265's - but in a 17" (so, 265/70). While I know I'll lose a little comfort, I'll get a better contact patch out of it, and the wheel will look a little 'bigger' in the well, compared to the 16".

The OEM 245/75/16s just look so small in the well, both height- & width-wise. With the wider rear fender in the new truck (kinda like a quasi-dually), I figure that would just be exacerbated. And yet, when I look at the label in the door, the truck came from the factory with the same 245/75/16's.


As far as height - while I'd never put a bona-fide lift on the truck, the stock stance does strike me as a little exaggerated (I know the rear sits higher for anticipated load; at least, that's how the first one sits - 'head down, @ss up', as it were...lol.)

Follow-up question - What potential harm (if any) would result in leaving this new truck at a level stance - assuming that it is level, and that the stock torsion keys were adjusted to achieve it? I've heard that torquing those keys down to achieve front end lift is no bueno.

If it means accelerated wear on the keys (-?), that might be OK. I did the LCAs on the first truck, and the torsion bars don't frighten me any more.
If it means accelerated tire wear, I'd probably bring it back to stock. Guessing most people would be the opposite of me (they'd replace 10 sets of tires vs. the bars / keys)... call me crazy :blinkhuh:
 

littleblazer

Gold Supporter
#19
I was thinking about 265's - but in a 17" (so, 265/70). While I know I'll lose a little comfort, I'll get a better contact patch out of it, and the wheel will look a little 'bigger' in the well, compared to the 16".

The OEM 245/75/16s just look so small in the well, both height- & width-wise. With the wider rear fender in the new truck (kinda like a quasi-dually), I figure that would just be exacerbated. And yet, when I look at the label in the door, the truck came from the factory with the same 245/75/16's.


As far as height - while I'd never put a bona-fide lift on the truck, the stock stance does strike me as a little exaggerated (I know the rear sits higher for anticipated load; at least, that's how the first one sits - 'head down, @ss up', as it were...lol.)

Follow-up question - What potential harm (if any) would result in leaving this new truck at a level stance - assuming that it is level, and that the stock torsion keys were adjusted to achieve it? I've heard that torquing those keys down to achieve front end lift is no bueno.

If it means accelerated wear on the keys (-?), that might be OK. I did the LCAs on the first truck, and the torsion bars don't frighten me any more.
If it means accelerated tire wear, I'd probably bring it back to stock. Guessing most people would be the opposite of me (they'd replace 10 sets of tires vs. the bars / keys)... call me crazy :blinkhuh:
As long as you have travel before the bump stops and the CVs aren't bent over and the ball joints are at a reasonable angle there isn't a problem using the keys other than a rougher ride. Just make sure the front end was aligned after raising it otherwise you'll run through tires. The whole point of keys is to level it with load, so raising it with them removes that from the equation...
 

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